Darnell Lamont Walker leading Rituals Writing Workshop
Psychedelic Perspectives: Ancestors, Sacred Earth Medicine and Radical Self Transformation with the Sabina Project
Category:
Healing

Charlotte James and Undrea Wright are the founders of The Ancestor Project (formerly known as The Sabina Project), a black-led platform for psychedelic education, legal ceremonies, and integration. Their mission is to return reverence to sacred earth medicine ways, to look to and learn from ancestral practices and to support radical self-transformation in the name of collective liberation. When Charlotte and Dre appeared on a recent episode of Voices of Esalen in conversation with Esalen’s Sam Stern, they discussed how they transitioned from lives filled with stress and psychic noise to new ways of being.

Ten years ago, Charlotte was in college and learning to let her “true inner self out”, but something was lacking. “I was a very high-functioning anxious person, like super type-A,” she explains. “Externally, I was very successful, quote unquote — successful in the sense that I was a really good student and always had good jobs. And so for others it seemed strange that I didn't feel that way in my mind.”

Even after a move to Bolivia where she spent time exploring sacred medicines with an intentional community, upon her return to the United States Charlotte drifted back into what she calls “the lack of intentionality that we frequently find ourselves in the Western world.” She started therapy and, soon after, met Dre. “I had my first Kambo ceremony and that just really moved the door open for me to stepping into my power and reclaiming who I truly am,” Charlotte explains.

For Dre, the journey toward plant medicine began about 12 years ago when he found himself 40, overweight, working 80-hour work weeks, and, as he puts it, “miserable.” Seeking a radical change, he joined the military only to have an epiphany after trying his first cannabis edible shortly thereafter. “ I had this amazing experience.

And then I was like, frustrated and angry. I realized, everything I've been told about drugs was a complete lie.” Next came a transformative experience with psilocybin, and by the end of the week, an ayahuasca ceremony. “I had a rebirth,” he recalls. “Three weeks later, I was in Peru doing my first dieta, and I never looked back from that. And then I learned to do Kambo treatments and that took my health and wellness to the next level. From that point, I was like this is my path…and so I began my journey learning to support myself and then hold space and help support other people in the healing process.”

“Remembering to be as self compassionate as I can and praying to the divine that we're all a part of.” 
–Aaron

“Prayer, reading, meditation, walking.”
–Karen
“Erratically — which is an ongoing stream of practice to find peace.”
–Charles
“Try on a daily basis to be kind to myself and to realize that making mistakes is a part of the human condition. Learning from our mistakes is a journey. But it starts with compassion and caring. First for oneself.”
–Steve

“Physically: aerobic exercise, volleyball, ice hockey, cycling, sailing. Emotionally: unfortunately I have to work to ‘not care’ about people or situations which may end painfully. Along the lines of ‘attachment is the source of suffering’, so best to avoid it or limit its scope. Sad though because it could also be the source of great joy. Is it worth the risk?“
–Rainer

“It's time for my heart to be nurtured on one level yet contained on another. To go easy on me and to allow my feelings to be validated, not judged harshly. On the other hand, to let the heart rule with equanimity and not lead the mind and body around like a master.”
–Suzanne

“I spend time thinking of everything I am grateful for, and I try to develop my ability to express compassion for myself and others without reservation. I take time to do the things I need to do to keep myself healthy and happy. This includes taking experiential workshops, fostering relationships, and participating within groups which have a similar interest to become a more compassionate and fulfilled being.“
–Peter

“Self-forgiveness for my own judgments. And oh yeah, coming to Esalen.”
–David B.

“Hmm, this is a tough one! I guess I take care of my heart through fostering relationships with people I feel connected to. Spending quality time with them (whether we're on the phone, through messages/letters, on Zoom, or in-person). Being there for them, listening to them, sharing what's going on with me, my struggles and my successes... like we do in the Esalen weekly Friends of Esalen Zoom sessions!”
–Lori

“I remind myself in many ways of the fact that " Love is all there is!" LOVE is the prize and this one precious life is the stage we get to learn our lessons. I get out into nature, hike, camp, river kayak, fly fish, garden, I create, I dance (not enough!), and I remain grateful for each day, each breath, each moment. Being in the moment, awake, and remembering the gift of life and my feeling of gratitude for all of creation.”
–Steven
“My physical heart by limiting stress and eating a heart-healthy diet. My emotional heart by staying in love with the world and by knowing that all disappointment and loss will pass.“
–David Z.


Today, September 29, is World Heart Day. Strike up a conversation with your own heart and as you feel comfortable, encourage others to do the same. As part of our own transformations and self-care, we sometimes ask for others to illuminate and enliven our hearts or speak our love language.

What if we could do this for ourselves too, even if just for today… or to start a heart practice, forever?


Intrigued by what you’re reading? Head over to Voices of Esalen to hear the full conversation with Charlotte and Dre, and subscribe to the podcast to hear more conversations like these!

Listen in

About

Esalen Team

Psychedelic Perspectives: Ancestors, Sacred Earth Medicine and Radical Self Transformation with the Sabina Project

About

Esalen Team

Darnell Lamont Walker leading Rituals Writing Workshop
Category:
Healing

Charlotte James and Undrea Wright are the founders of The Ancestor Project (formerly known as The Sabina Project), a black-led platform for psychedelic education, legal ceremonies, and integration. Their mission is to return reverence to sacred earth medicine ways, to look to and learn from ancestral practices and to support radical self-transformation in the name of collective liberation. When Charlotte and Dre appeared on a recent episode of Voices of Esalen in conversation with Esalen’s Sam Stern, they discussed how they transitioned from lives filled with stress and psychic noise to new ways of being.

Ten years ago, Charlotte was in college and learning to let her “true inner self out”, but something was lacking. “I was a very high-functioning anxious person, like super type-A,” she explains. “Externally, I was very successful, quote unquote — successful in the sense that I was a really good student and always had good jobs. And so for others it seemed strange that I didn't feel that way in my mind.”

Even after a move to Bolivia where she spent time exploring sacred medicines with an intentional community, upon her return to the United States Charlotte drifted back into what she calls “the lack of intentionality that we frequently find ourselves in the Western world.” She started therapy and, soon after, met Dre. “I had my first Kambo ceremony and that just really moved the door open for me to stepping into my power and reclaiming who I truly am,” Charlotte explains.

For Dre, the journey toward plant medicine began about 12 years ago when he found himself 40, overweight, working 80-hour work weeks, and, as he puts it, “miserable.” Seeking a radical change, he joined the military only to have an epiphany after trying his first cannabis edible shortly thereafter. “ I had this amazing experience.

And then I was like, frustrated and angry. I realized, everything I've been told about drugs was a complete lie.” Next came a transformative experience with psilocybin, and by the end of the week, an ayahuasca ceremony. “I had a rebirth,” he recalls. “Three weeks later, I was in Peru doing my first dieta, and I never looked back from that. And then I learned to do Kambo treatments and that took my health and wellness to the next level. From that point, I was like this is my path…and so I began my journey learning to support myself and then hold space and help support other people in the healing process.”

“Remembering to be as self compassionate as I can and praying to the divine that we're all a part of.” 
–Aaron

“Prayer, reading, meditation, walking.”
–Karen
“Erratically — which is an ongoing stream of practice to find peace.”
–Charles
“Try on a daily basis to be kind to myself and to realize that making mistakes is a part of the human condition. Learning from our mistakes is a journey. But it starts with compassion and caring. First for oneself.”
–Steve

“Physically: aerobic exercise, volleyball, ice hockey, cycling, sailing. Emotionally: unfortunately I have to work to ‘not care’ about people or situations which may end painfully. Along the lines of ‘attachment is the source of suffering’, so best to avoid it or limit its scope. Sad though because it could also be the source of great joy. Is it worth the risk?“
–Rainer

“It's time for my heart to be nurtured on one level yet contained on another. To go easy on me and to allow my feelings to be validated, not judged harshly. On the other hand, to let the heart rule with equanimity and not lead the mind and body around like a master.”
–Suzanne

“I spend time thinking of everything I am grateful for, and I try to develop my ability to express compassion for myself and others without reservation. I take time to do the things I need to do to keep myself healthy and happy. This includes taking experiential workshops, fostering relationships, and participating within groups which have a similar interest to become a more compassionate and fulfilled being.“
–Peter

“Self-forgiveness for my own judgments. And oh yeah, coming to Esalen.”
–David B.

“Hmm, this is a tough one! I guess I take care of my heart through fostering relationships with people I feel connected to. Spending quality time with them (whether we're on the phone, through messages/letters, on Zoom, or in-person). Being there for them, listening to them, sharing what's going on with me, my struggles and my successes... like we do in the Esalen weekly Friends of Esalen Zoom sessions!”
–Lori

“I remind myself in many ways of the fact that " Love is all there is!" LOVE is the prize and this one precious life is the stage we get to learn our lessons. I get out into nature, hike, camp, river kayak, fly fish, garden, I create, I dance (not enough!), and I remain grateful for each day, each breath, each moment. Being in the moment, awake, and remembering the gift of life and my feeling of gratitude for all of creation.”
–Steven
“My physical heart by limiting stress and eating a heart-healthy diet. My emotional heart by staying in love with the world and by knowing that all disappointment and loss will pass.“
–David Z.


Today, September 29, is World Heart Day. Strike up a conversation with your own heart and as you feel comfortable, encourage others to do the same. As part of our own transformations and self-care, we sometimes ask for others to illuminate and enliven our hearts or speak our love language.

What if we could do this for ourselves too, even if just for today… or to start a heart practice, forever?


Intrigued by what you’re reading? Head over to Voices of Esalen to hear the full conversation with Charlotte and Dre, and subscribe to the podcast to hear more conversations like these!

Listen in

About

Esalen Team

Darnell Lamont Walker leading Rituals Writing Workshop
Psychedelic Perspectives: Ancestors, Sacred Earth Medicine and Radical Self Transformation with the Sabina Project
Category:
Healing
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