Darnell Lamont Walker leading Rituals Writing Workshop
Sacred Music, Devotional Yoga
Category:
Healing

Gopi Kallayil, author of The Internet to the Inner-Net and the soon-to-be released The Happy Human, is blending his passions for yoga, sacred music, and meditation in a self-described experiment set against the backdrop of Shangri La.

“I’ve had a vision for a while of something centered around these three domains,” he says of the upcoming Bhakti Yoga and Music Celebration hosted the weekend of September 7-9. “Esalen is the perfect setting for this experiment. It’s like going on a pilgrimage — once you get there, you break through the clouds and you are in Shangri La.”

The property-wide experiential celebration features two musical ensembles, Fanna-Fi-Allah and the Kirtaniyas, representing different aspects of sacred music: qawwali and kirtan.

Fanna-Fi-Allah perform a form of Sufi devotional music dating back more than 700 years. The Canadian-American group includes the first female tabla player to be initiated into the lineage of qawwali.

The Kirtaniyas combine the traditional call and response signing of ancient Sanskrit mantras with electronic dance music. And even if you don’t understand Sanskrit, the vibrations are powerful.

According to Gopi, the 60/80 beats a minute resonates with that of the human heart beat. “Many nursery rhymes and lullabies follow the same rhythm,” says Gopi.

The weekend is designed for first-time practitioners in yoga and meditation as well as more experienced individuals. For those familiar with the traditions, the weekend is an opportunity to nurture yourself through the practice of bhakti yoga elements and honoring the mind, body, and spirit. “If you are not as familiar with these elements,” adds Gopi, “this is an opportunity to peer into this world in a way that is beautiful and easily accessible no matter what culture you’re from.”

“It’s an interesting juxtaposition,” observes Gopi of the musical collective. “It is rare that on the same stage there is sufi qawwali music with classic kirtan from a Hindu tradition. Even more beautiful is that we can find commonality through two independent music traditions in a modern world.”

Reserve your spot for the Bhakti Yoga and Music Celebration, September 7-9, 2018.

Photo by Alena Dubavaya

“Remembering to be as self compassionate as I can and praying to the divine that we're all a part of.” 
–Aaron

“Prayer, reading, meditation, walking.”
–Karen
“Erratically — which is an ongoing stream of practice to find peace.”
–Charles
“Try on a daily basis to be kind to myself and to realize that making mistakes is a part of the human condition. Learning from our mistakes is a journey. But it starts with compassion and caring. First for oneself.”
–Steve

“Physically: aerobic exercise, volleyball, ice hockey, cycling, sailing. Emotionally: unfortunately I have to work to ‘not care’ about people or situations which may end painfully. Along the lines of ‘attachment is the source of suffering’, so best to avoid it or limit its scope. Sad though because it could also be the source of great joy. Is it worth the risk?“
–Rainer

“It's time for my heart to be nurtured on one level yet contained on another. To go easy on me and to allow my feelings to be validated, not judged harshly. On the other hand, to let the heart rule with equanimity and not lead the mind and body around like a master.”
–Suzanne

“I spend time thinking of everything I am grateful for, and I try to develop my ability to express compassion for myself and others without reservation. I take time to do the things I need to do to keep myself healthy and happy. This includes taking experiential workshops, fostering relationships, and participating within groups which have a similar interest to become a more compassionate and fulfilled being.“
–Peter

“Self-forgiveness for my own judgments. And oh yeah, coming to Esalen.”
–David B.

“Hmm, this is a tough one! I guess I take care of my heart through fostering relationships with people I feel connected to. Spending quality time with them (whether we're on the phone, through messages/letters, on Zoom, or in-person). Being there for them, listening to them, sharing what's going on with me, my struggles and my successes... like we do in the Esalen weekly Friends of Esalen Zoom sessions!”
–Lori

“I remind myself in many ways of the fact that " Love is all there is!" LOVE is the prize and this one precious life is the stage we get to learn our lessons. I get out into nature, hike, camp, river kayak, fly fish, garden, I create, I dance (not enough!), and I remain grateful for each day, each breath, each moment. Being in the moment, awake, and remembering the gift of life and my feeling of gratitude for all of creation.”
–Steven
“My physical heart by limiting stress and eating a heart-healthy diet. My emotional heart by staying in love with the world and by knowing that all disappointment and loss will pass.“
–David Z.


Today, September 29, is World Heart Day. Strike up a conversation with your own heart and as you feel comfortable, encourage others to do the same. As part of our own transformations and self-care, we sometimes ask for others to illuminate and enliven our hearts or speak our love language.

What if we could do this for ourselves too, even if just for today… or to start a heart practice, forever?



About

Esalen Team

Sacred Music, Devotional Yoga

About

Esalen Team

Darnell Lamont Walker leading Rituals Writing Workshop
Category:
Healing

Gopi Kallayil, author of The Internet to the Inner-Net and the soon-to-be released The Happy Human, is blending his passions for yoga, sacred music, and meditation in a self-described experiment set against the backdrop of Shangri La.

“I’ve had a vision for a while of something centered around these three domains,” he says of the upcoming Bhakti Yoga and Music Celebration hosted the weekend of September 7-9. “Esalen is the perfect setting for this experiment. It’s like going on a pilgrimage — once you get there, you break through the clouds and you are in Shangri La.”

The property-wide experiential celebration features two musical ensembles, Fanna-Fi-Allah and the Kirtaniyas, representing different aspects of sacred music: qawwali and kirtan.

Fanna-Fi-Allah perform a form of Sufi devotional music dating back more than 700 years. The Canadian-American group includes the first female tabla player to be initiated into the lineage of qawwali.

The Kirtaniyas combine the traditional call and response signing of ancient Sanskrit mantras with electronic dance music. And even if you don’t understand Sanskrit, the vibrations are powerful.

According to Gopi, the 60/80 beats a minute resonates with that of the human heart beat. “Many nursery rhymes and lullabies follow the same rhythm,” says Gopi.

The weekend is designed for first-time practitioners in yoga and meditation as well as more experienced individuals. For those familiar with the traditions, the weekend is an opportunity to nurture yourself through the practice of bhakti yoga elements and honoring the mind, body, and spirit. “If you are not as familiar with these elements,” adds Gopi, “this is an opportunity to peer into this world in a way that is beautiful and easily accessible no matter what culture you’re from.”

“It’s an interesting juxtaposition,” observes Gopi of the musical collective. “It is rare that on the same stage there is sufi qawwali music with classic kirtan from a Hindu tradition. Even more beautiful is that we can find commonality through two independent music traditions in a modern world.”

Reserve your spot for the Bhakti Yoga and Music Celebration, September 7-9, 2018.

Photo by Alena Dubavaya

“Remembering to be as self compassionate as I can and praying to the divine that we're all a part of.” 
–Aaron

“Prayer, reading, meditation, walking.”
–Karen
“Erratically — which is an ongoing stream of practice to find peace.”
–Charles
“Try on a daily basis to be kind to myself and to realize that making mistakes is a part of the human condition. Learning from our mistakes is a journey. But it starts with compassion and caring. First for oneself.”
–Steve

“Physically: aerobic exercise, volleyball, ice hockey, cycling, sailing. Emotionally: unfortunately I have to work to ‘not care’ about people or situations which may end painfully. Along the lines of ‘attachment is the source of suffering’, so best to avoid it or limit its scope. Sad though because it could also be the source of great joy. Is it worth the risk?“
–Rainer

“It's time for my heart to be nurtured on one level yet contained on another. To go easy on me and to allow my feelings to be validated, not judged harshly. On the other hand, to let the heart rule with equanimity and not lead the mind and body around like a master.”
–Suzanne

“I spend time thinking of everything I am grateful for, and I try to develop my ability to express compassion for myself and others without reservation. I take time to do the things I need to do to keep myself healthy and happy. This includes taking experiential workshops, fostering relationships, and participating within groups which have a similar interest to become a more compassionate and fulfilled being.“
–Peter

“Self-forgiveness for my own judgments. And oh yeah, coming to Esalen.”
–David B.

“Hmm, this is a tough one! I guess I take care of my heart through fostering relationships with people I feel connected to. Spending quality time with them (whether we're on the phone, through messages/letters, on Zoom, or in-person). Being there for them, listening to them, sharing what's going on with me, my struggles and my successes... like we do in the Esalen weekly Friends of Esalen Zoom sessions!”
–Lori

“I remind myself in many ways of the fact that " Love is all there is!" LOVE is the prize and this one precious life is the stage we get to learn our lessons. I get out into nature, hike, camp, river kayak, fly fish, garden, I create, I dance (not enough!), and I remain grateful for each day, each breath, each moment. Being in the moment, awake, and remembering the gift of life and my feeling of gratitude for all of creation.”
–Steven
“My physical heart by limiting stress and eating a heart-healthy diet. My emotional heart by staying in love with the world and by knowing that all disappointment and loss will pass.“
–David Z.


Today, September 29, is World Heart Day. Strike up a conversation with your own heart and as you feel comfortable, encourage others to do the same. As part of our own transformations and self-care, we sometimes ask for others to illuminate and enliven our hearts or speak our love language.

What if we could do this for ourselves too, even if just for today… or to start a heart practice, forever?



About

Esalen Team

Darnell Lamont Walker leading Rituals Writing Workshop
Sacred Music, Devotional Yoga
Category:
Healing

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Sacred Music, Devotional Yoga

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