Darnell Lamont Walker leading Rituals Writing Workshop
Esalen Reads: What's on Ann Randolph's Nightstand?
"'Be nothing. Do nothing. Become nothing. Seek for nothing. Relinquish nothing. Be as you are. Rest in God.' These words were given to Miranda MacPherson through a transmission she received from Sri Ramana Maharshi while visiting his cave in India. I find myself often repeating these words from her book, The Way of Grace when the ego wants to take the driver’s seat, which is all the time. It’s a continual practice."
— Ann Randolph

We delve into books for so many different reasons: guidance, knowledge, curiosity and oftentimes to lose ourselves in a captivating tale that can take us to the farthest stretches of our imagination. Esalen News invites our faculty to share what’s on their nightstand and why.

Esalen faculty Ann Randolph is an award-winning writer and performer with plenty of wit and verve. Her solo shows, Inappropriate in All the Right Ways, Loveland and Squeeze Box have been heralded and her workshops — at Esalen and beyond — aptly balance depth and humor. Ann shares her latest book pick with Esalen News.

Esalen News: What is the latest book you read?

Ann Randolph: The Way of Grace: The Transforming Power of Ego Relaxation by Miranda MacPherson and the audible version is the best. Her voice is one of compassion and kindness. She leads the meditations with her harmonium and you can’t get that from the book.

What drew you to the book?

I went to a meditation Miranda led in the Leonard Pavilion at Esalen and fell in love with her teachings.

What did you find most inspiring about the book?

Miranda has beautiful self-inquiry exercises and meditations to help me let go the grip of control and welcome uncertainty.

What are several other things that really stood out?

"Be nothing. Do nothing. Become nothing. Seek for nothing. Relinquish nothing. Be as you are. Rest in God.” These words were given to Miranda through a transmission she received from Sri Ramana Maharshi while visiting his cave in India. I find myself often repeating these words from her book when the ego wants to take the driver’s seat which is all the time. It’s a continual practice.

What other things did you learn?

How to drop the judgement of myself and others, bowing to the beauty and the mystery, and gentle ways to bring compassion to those parts within me which I don’t like and see how they bring me again and again to God.

How would you sum up the book in a few words?

Kindness, compassion and love pouring from the pages.

“Remembering to be as self compassionate as I can and praying to the divine that we're all a part of.” 
–Aaron

“Prayer, reading, meditation, walking.”
–Karen
“Erratically — which is an ongoing stream of practice to find peace.”
–Charles
“Try on a daily basis to be kind to myself and to realize that making mistakes is a part of the human condition. Learning from our mistakes is a journey. But it starts with compassion and caring. First for oneself.”
–Steve

“Physically: aerobic exercise, volleyball, ice hockey, cycling, sailing. Emotionally: unfortunately I have to work to ‘not care’ about people or situations which may end painfully. Along the lines of ‘attachment is the source of suffering’, so best to avoid it or limit its scope. Sad though because it could also be the source of great joy. Is it worth the risk?“
–Rainer

“It's time for my heart to be nurtured on one level yet contained on another. To go easy on me and to allow my feelings to be validated, not judged harshly. On the other hand, to let the heart rule with equanimity and not lead the mind and body around like a master.”
–Suzanne

“I spend time thinking of everything I am grateful for, and I try to develop my ability to express compassion for myself and others without reservation. I take time to do the things I need to do to keep myself healthy and happy. This includes taking experiential workshops, fostering relationships, and participating within groups which have a similar interest to become a more compassionate and fulfilled being.“
–Peter

“Self-forgiveness for my own judgments. And oh yeah, coming to Esalen.”
–David B.

“Hmm, this is a tough one! I guess I take care of my heart through fostering relationships with people I feel connected to. Spending quality time with them (whether we're on the phone, through messages/letters, on Zoom, or in-person). Being there for them, listening to them, sharing what's going on with me, my struggles and my successes... like we do in the Esalen weekly Friends of Esalen Zoom sessions!”
–Lori

“I remind myself in many ways of the fact that " Love is all there is!" LOVE is the prize and this one precious life is the stage we get to learn our lessons. I get out into nature, hike, camp, river kayak, fly fish, garden, I create, I dance (not enough!), and I remain grateful for each day, each breath, each moment. Being in the moment, awake, and remembering the gift of life and my feeling of gratitude for all of creation.”
–Steven
“My physical heart by limiting stress and eating a heart-healthy diet. My emotional heart by staying in love with the world and by knowing that all disappointment and loss will pass.“
–David Z.


Today, September 29, is World Heart Day. Strike up a conversation with your own heart and as you feel comfortable, encourage others to do the same. As part of our own transformations and self-care, we sometimes ask for others to illuminate and enliven our hearts or speak our love language.

What if we could do this for ourselves too, even if just for today… or to start a heart practice, forever?



About

Esalen Team

Darnell Lamont Walker leading Rituals Writing Workshop
"'Be nothing. Do nothing. Become nothing. Seek for nothing. Relinquish nothing. Be as you are. Rest in God.' These words were given to Miranda MacPherson through a transmission she received from Sri Ramana Maharshi while visiting his cave in India. I find myself often repeating these words from her book, The Way of Grace when the ego wants to take the driver’s seat, which is all the time. It’s a continual practice."
— Ann Randolph

We delve into books for so many different reasons: guidance, knowledge, curiosity and oftentimes to lose ourselves in a captivating tale that can take us to the farthest stretches of our imagination. Esalen News invites our faculty to share what’s on their nightstand and why.

Esalen faculty Ann Randolph is an award-winning writer and performer with plenty of wit and verve. Her solo shows, Inappropriate in All the Right Ways, Loveland and Squeeze Box have been heralded and her workshops — at Esalen and beyond — aptly balance depth and humor. Ann shares her latest book pick with Esalen News.

Esalen News: What is the latest book you read?

Ann Randolph: The Way of Grace: The Transforming Power of Ego Relaxation by Miranda MacPherson and the audible version is the best. Her voice is one of compassion and kindness. She leads the meditations with her harmonium and you can’t get that from the book.

What drew you to the book?

I went to a meditation Miranda led in the Leonard Pavilion at Esalen and fell in love with her teachings.

What did you find most inspiring about the book?

Miranda has beautiful self-inquiry exercises and meditations to help me let go the grip of control and welcome uncertainty.

What are several other things that really stood out?

"Be nothing. Do nothing. Become nothing. Seek for nothing. Relinquish nothing. Be as you are. Rest in God.” These words were given to Miranda through a transmission she received from Sri Ramana Maharshi while visiting his cave in India. I find myself often repeating these words from her book when the ego wants to take the driver’s seat which is all the time. It’s a continual practice.

What other things did you learn?

How to drop the judgement of myself and others, bowing to the beauty and the mystery, and gentle ways to bring compassion to those parts within me which I don’t like and see how they bring me again and again to God.

How would you sum up the book in a few words?

Kindness, compassion and love pouring from the pages.

“Remembering to be as self compassionate as I can and praying to the divine that we're all a part of.” 
–Aaron

“Prayer, reading, meditation, walking.”
–Karen
“Erratically — which is an ongoing stream of practice to find peace.”
–Charles
“Try on a daily basis to be kind to myself and to realize that making mistakes is a part of the human condition. Learning from our mistakes is a journey. But it starts with compassion and caring. First for oneself.”
–Steve

“Physically: aerobic exercise, volleyball, ice hockey, cycling, sailing. Emotionally: unfortunately I have to work to ‘not care’ about people or situations which may end painfully. Along the lines of ‘attachment is the source of suffering’, so best to avoid it or limit its scope. Sad though because it could also be the source of great joy. Is it worth the risk?“
–Rainer

“It's time for my heart to be nurtured on one level yet contained on another. To go easy on me and to allow my feelings to be validated, not judged harshly. On the other hand, to let the heart rule with equanimity and not lead the mind and body around like a master.”
–Suzanne

“I spend time thinking of everything I am grateful for, and I try to develop my ability to express compassion for myself and others without reservation. I take time to do the things I need to do to keep myself healthy and happy. This includes taking experiential workshops, fostering relationships, and participating within groups which have a similar interest to become a more compassionate and fulfilled being.“
–Peter

“Self-forgiveness for my own judgments. And oh yeah, coming to Esalen.”
–David B.

“Hmm, this is a tough one! I guess I take care of my heart through fostering relationships with people I feel connected to. Spending quality time with them (whether we're on the phone, through messages/letters, on Zoom, or in-person). Being there for them, listening to them, sharing what's going on with me, my struggles and my successes... like we do in the Esalen weekly Friends of Esalen Zoom sessions!”
–Lori

“I remind myself in many ways of the fact that " Love is all there is!" LOVE is the prize and this one precious life is the stage we get to learn our lessons. I get out into nature, hike, camp, river kayak, fly fish, garden, I create, I dance (not enough!), and I remain grateful for each day, each breath, each moment. Being in the moment, awake, and remembering the gift of life and my feeling of gratitude for all of creation.”
–Steven
“My physical heart by limiting stress and eating a heart-healthy diet. My emotional heart by staying in love with the world and by knowing that all disappointment and loss will pass.“
–David Z.


Today, September 29, is World Heart Day. Strike up a conversation with your own heart and as you feel comfortable, encourage others to do the same. As part of our own transformations and self-care, we sometimes ask for others to illuminate and enliven our hearts or speak our love language.

What if we could do this for ourselves too, even if just for today… or to start a heart practice, forever?



About

Esalen Team

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