Darnell Lamont Walker leading Rituals Writing Workshop
Water is Sacred at Esalen

Esalen has been considered a place of sacred waters for thousands of years. Here, three water sources converge to heal and nourish the web of all life. The canyon stream that cascades through the Esalen property is fed by a spring that provides us with water for our daily use. The hot springs are heated by the earth’s inner fires, and this water is a source of both healing and energy. The ocean here is pristine, wild, and remote. This section of the pacific coastline is a haven for wild life, including sea otters, birds, and fisheries.

This year at Esalen, we deepen our commitment to being exemplary stewards of the waters that flow through our land. As California, North America, and the world face an escalating water crisis, we recognize that all of us need to take responsibility for using this precious resource wisely, in a way that sustains us, the land, and future generations.

Esalen continuously seeks to embody its mission as an interactive educational institution dedicated to creating conditions for personal and societal transformational. By demonstrating a mindful approach to water usage, we hope to create a ripple of new water consciousness by inspiring the cultural change-makers who flow through Esalen.

Water Highlights for 2015

  • Thanks to the commitment and ingenuity of the grounds and maintenance departments, 85% of the south side of our property as well as the areas around the Murphy house on the north side of property are using water that would otherwise spill directly into the ocean. First, using heat transfer technology, the extra hot springs water heats our pool, then it is irrigated throughout the landscape. This way, the water still returns to the ocean, but first re-cycles through our landscape, increasing the abundance and beauty of our grounds.
  • The rebuild of the lodge will include cutting-edge cleaning systems in the kitchen that will significantly reduce water consumption and use 100% biodegradable detergents.
  • Our farm and garden is committed to expanding systems for reducing water use, maximizing water catchment, and harnessing grey-water. Already, they are experimenting with using overflow hot springs water for production of food crops and have expanded their orchard in order to diversify food and reduce water usage. This year a focus on water will become a key educational component in the farm and garden internship and apprenticeship program.
  • Our leading-edge “living machine” processes waste water from the Maslow guest units and from the laundry, a significant consumer of water on property. The system mimics tidal wetlands and uses natural biological process to treat black-water. The system is in the process of being updated and readied for expansion after the construction of the new lodge.
  • Our Residential Education program is bringing in experts in wise water use this fall to increase awareness amongst staff, work scholars, extended students, and seminarians.
  • The Gazebo School demonstrates water catchment and teaches children about the importance of water conservation and stewardship through experience based learning.
  • In January 2015, as a part of our campus-wide eco-footprint project, we installed new water meters that will help us better understand and manage our complicated water flows.
  • As a part of our ongoing commitment to sustainable procurement, we will review our purchasing practices to make sure that they are aligned with our values, particularly in terms of their effect on water systems.
  • We are in the process of identifying additional areas where we can reduce and reuse water throughout the campus, such as towel reduction strategy, and expanded communication and signage highlighting wise-water practices.

“Remembering to be as self compassionate as I can and praying to the divine that we're all a part of.” 
–Aaron

“Prayer, reading, meditation, walking.”
–Karen
“Erratically — which is an ongoing stream of practice to find peace.”
–Charles
“Try on a daily basis to be kind to myself and to realize that making mistakes is a part of the human condition. Learning from our mistakes is a journey. But it starts with compassion and caring. First for oneself.”
–Steve

“Physically: aerobic exercise, volleyball, ice hockey, cycling, sailing. Emotionally: unfortunately I have to work to ‘not care’ about people or situations which may end painfully. Along the lines of ‘attachment is the source of suffering’, so best to avoid it or limit its scope. Sad though because it could also be the source of great joy. Is it worth the risk?“
–Rainer

“It's time for my heart to be nurtured on one level yet contained on another. To go easy on me and to allow my feelings to be validated, not judged harshly. On the other hand, to let the heart rule with equanimity and not lead the mind and body around like a master.”
–Suzanne

“I spend time thinking of everything I am grateful for, and I try to develop my ability to express compassion for myself and others without reservation. I take time to do the things I need to do to keep myself healthy and happy. This includes taking experiential workshops, fostering relationships, and participating within groups which have a similar interest to become a more compassionate and fulfilled being.“
–Peter

“Self-forgiveness for my own judgments. And oh yeah, coming to Esalen.”
–David B.

“Hmm, this is a tough one! I guess I take care of my heart through fostering relationships with people I feel connected to. Spending quality time with them (whether we're on the phone, through messages/letters, on Zoom, or in-person). Being there for them, listening to them, sharing what's going on with me, my struggles and my successes... like we do in the Esalen weekly Friends of Esalen Zoom sessions!”
–Lori

“I remind myself in many ways of the fact that " Love is all there is!" LOVE is the prize and this one precious life is the stage we get to learn our lessons. I get out into nature, hike, camp, river kayak, fly fish, garden, I create, I dance (not enough!), and I remain grateful for each day, each breath, each moment. Being in the moment, awake, and remembering the gift of life and my feeling of gratitude for all of creation.”
–Steven
“My physical heart by limiting stress and eating a heart-healthy diet. My emotional heart by staying in love with the world and by knowing that all disappointment and loss will pass.“
–David Z.


Today, September 29, is World Heart Day. Strike up a conversation with your own heart and as you feel comfortable, encourage others to do the same. As part of our own transformations and self-care, we sometimes ask for others to illuminate and enliven our hearts or speak our love language.

What if we could do this for ourselves too, even if just for today… or to start a heart practice, forever?



About

Esalen Team

Water is Sacred at Esalen

About

Esalen Team

Darnell Lamont Walker leading Rituals Writing Workshop

Esalen has been considered a place of sacred waters for thousands of years. Here, three water sources converge to heal and nourish the web of all life. The canyon stream that cascades through the Esalen property is fed by a spring that provides us with water for our daily use. The hot springs are heated by the earth’s inner fires, and this water is a source of both healing and energy. The ocean here is pristine, wild, and remote. This section of the pacific coastline is a haven for wild life, including sea otters, birds, and fisheries.

This year at Esalen, we deepen our commitment to being exemplary stewards of the waters that flow through our land. As California, North America, and the world face an escalating water crisis, we recognize that all of us need to take responsibility for using this precious resource wisely, in a way that sustains us, the land, and future generations.

Esalen continuously seeks to embody its mission as an interactive educational institution dedicated to creating conditions for personal and societal transformational. By demonstrating a mindful approach to water usage, we hope to create a ripple of new water consciousness by inspiring the cultural change-makers who flow through Esalen.

Water Highlights for 2015

  • Thanks to the commitment and ingenuity of the grounds and maintenance departments, 85% of the south side of our property as well as the areas around the Murphy house on the north side of property are using water that would otherwise spill directly into the ocean. First, using heat transfer technology, the extra hot springs water heats our pool, then it is irrigated throughout the landscape. This way, the water still returns to the ocean, but first re-cycles through our landscape, increasing the abundance and beauty of our grounds.
  • The rebuild of the lodge will include cutting-edge cleaning systems in the kitchen that will significantly reduce water consumption and use 100% biodegradable detergents.
  • Our farm and garden is committed to expanding systems for reducing water use, maximizing water catchment, and harnessing grey-water. Already, they are experimenting with using overflow hot springs water for production of food crops and have expanded their orchard in order to diversify food and reduce water usage. This year a focus on water will become a key educational component in the farm and garden internship and apprenticeship program.
  • Our leading-edge “living machine” processes waste water from the Maslow guest units and from the laundry, a significant consumer of water on property. The system mimics tidal wetlands and uses natural biological process to treat black-water. The system is in the process of being updated and readied for expansion after the construction of the new lodge.
  • Our Residential Education program is bringing in experts in wise water use this fall to increase awareness amongst staff, work scholars, extended students, and seminarians.
  • The Gazebo School demonstrates water catchment and teaches children about the importance of water conservation and stewardship through experience based learning.
  • In January 2015, as a part of our campus-wide eco-footprint project, we installed new water meters that will help us better understand and manage our complicated water flows.
  • As a part of our ongoing commitment to sustainable procurement, we will review our purchasing practices to make sure that they are aligned with our values, particularly in terms of their effect on water systems.
  • We are in the process of identifying additional areas where we can reduce and reuse water throughout the campus, such as towel reduction strategy, and expanded communication and signage highlighting wise-water practices.

“Remembering to be as self compassionate as I can and praying to the divine that we're all a part of.” 
–Aaron

“Prayer, reading, meditation, walking.”
–Karen
“Erratically — which is an ongoing stream of practice to find peace.”
–Charles
“Try on a daily basis to be kind to myself and to realize that making mistakes is a part of the human condition. Learning from our mistakes is a journey. But it starts with compassion and caring. First for oneself.”
–Steve

“Physically: aerobic exercise, volleyball, ice hockey, cycling, sailing. Emotionally: unfortunately I have to work to ‘not care’ about people or situations which may end painfully. Along the lines of ‘attachment is the source of suffering’, so best to avoid it or limit its scope. Sad though because it could also be the source of great joy. Is it worth the risk?“
–Rainer

“It's time for my heart to be nurtured on one level yet contained on another. To go easy on me and to allow my feelings to be validated, not judged harshly. On the other hand, to let the heart rule with equanimity and not lead the mind and body around like a master.”
–Suzanne

“I spend time thinking of everything I am grateful for, and I try to develop my ability to express compassion for myself and others without reservation. I take time to do the things I need to do to keep myself healthy and happy. This includes taking experiential workshops, fostering relationships, and participating within groups which have a similar interest to become a more compassionate and fulfilled being.“
–Peter

“Self-forgiveness for my own judgments. And oh yeah, coming to Esalen.”
–David B.

“Hmm, this is a tough one! I guess I take care of my heart through fostering relationships with people I feel connected to. Spending quality time with them (whether we're on the phone, through messages/letters, on Zoom, or in-person). Being there for them, listening to them, sharing what's going on with me, my struggles and my successes... like we do in the Esalen weekly Friends of Esalen Zoom sessions!”
–Lori

“I remind myself in many ways of the fact that " Love is all there is!" LOVE is the prize and this one precious life is the stage we get to learn our lessons. I get out into nature, hike, camp, river kayak, fly fish, garden, I create, I dance (not enough!), and I remain grateful for each day, each breath, each moment. Being in the moment, awake, and remembering the gift of life and my feeling of gratitude for all of creation.”
–Steven
“My physical heart by limiting stress and eating a heart-healthy diet. My emotional heart by staying in love with the world and by knowing that all disappointment and loss will pass.“
–David Z.


Today, September 29, is World Heart Day. Strike up a conversation with your own heart and as you feel comfortable, encourage others to do the same. As part of our own transformations and self-care, we sometimes ask for others to illuminate and enliven our hearts or speak our love language.

What if we could do this for ourselves too, even if just for today… or to start a heart practice, forever?



About

Esalen Team

Darnell Lamont Walker leading Rituals Writing Workshop
Water is Sacred at Esalen

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About

Esalen Team

Water is Sacred at Esalen

About

Esalen Team

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