Darnell Lamont Walker leading Rituals Writing Workshop
Vegetarian Nori Rolls with Organic Gourmet Leslie Cerier
Category:
Food

Gourmet organic chef and author Leslie Cerier will be teaching two workshops at Esalen this month. The weekend workshop, Delicious Meals in Minutes Fresh from the Esalen Garden (wait list only), will feature Esalen’s own fresh produce and herbs in nutritious and delicious meals. A week-long workshop, Improvisational Cooking for Health and Vitality (limited availability in standard accommodations), will delve even deeper into creative cooking.

Leslie shares a favorite recipe that will be included in her workshops, a vegetarian twist on sushi. Here’s how you can make your very own Nori Rice Rolls with Ginger Tofu.

You’ll need:

  • 4 cups Exotic Rice Blend (recipe follows)
  • 1 tablespoon light sesame oil
  • 1 tablespoon tamari
  • 1 tablespoon grated fresh ginger
  • 14 ounces extra-firm tofu, sliced into long rectangles about 1/2 inch thick
  • 2 cups grated beets
  • 1 cup grated carrots
  • 8 sheets toasted nori
  • 2 to 3 tablespoons umeboshi paste
  • 2 tablespoons wasabi powder, or more as needed
  • 2 tablespoons water
  • Tamari

Make Exotic Rice Blend (see below). While rice cools, heat oil, tamari and ginger in a medium-size skillet over medium heat. Add tofu and fry for 3 to 5 minutes on each side, until golden brown on both sides. (You may need to fry the tofu in a couple rounds.) Slice tofu slabs into thirds to make long strips.

Mix beets and carrots in a bowl.

Lay a sushi mat on a clean work surface with bamboo strips running horizontally. Place a nori piece on the mat, shiny side down. Spread about 1/2 cup rice on the nori, leaving the top 1 1/2 inches bare. Lay 2 or 3 tofu strips across the rice, horizontally, followed by some carrot-beet mixture. Gently press filling into rice. Spread some umeboshi paste over the top inch of the nori.

Starting at the end closest to you and using even pressure, use the sushi mat to roll the nori tightly and evenly around the rice and fillings. Be sure to pull the leading edge of the mat back so it doesn’t get incorporated into the roll. Once complete, give the mat a gentle squeeze along its entire length, then let the nori roll sit inside the mat for a minute to ensure a tight roll. Gently unroll the mat and use a very sharp serrated knife to slice the roll into 8 rounds. Repeat with remaining ingredients.

Put wasabi powder and water in a small bowl and stir to form a paste. For a thinner, less pungent dip, add a little more water.

To serve, place wasabi bowl in the center of a platter and surround it with the sushi rounds. Provide small bowls for tamari.

Variations: Feel free to swap ginger tempeh, hemp seeds and/or black sesame seeds for the tofu. You can swap other veggies, too. Makes 8 nori rolls.

Exotic Rice Blend

Cooking with black forbidden rice or Bhutanese red rice adds color to nori rolls, making them a feast for the eyes as well as the palate.

You’ll need:

  • 1 1/2 cups black forbidden rice or Bhutanese red rice
  • 1/2 cup sweet brown rice, rinsed
  • 4 cups cold water
  • Pinch of sea salt

Combine rice, water and salt in a large saucepan over medium-high heat. Bring to a boil; lower heat, cover and simmer for 30 to 40 minutes until all water is absorbed. Uncover rice and let stand for about 1 hour, until cool enough to handle, before making nori rolls.

Reprinted with permission from Gluten-Free Recipes for the Conscious Cook by Leslie Cerier (2010, New Harbinger Publications).

“Remembering to be as self compassionate as I can and praying to the divine that we're all a part of.” 
–Aaron

“Prayer, reading, meditation, walking.”
–Karen
“Erratically — which is an ongoing stream of practice to find peace.”
–Charles
“Try on a daily basis to be kind to myself and to realize that making mistakes is a part of the human condition. Learning from our mistakes is a journey. But it starts with compassion and caring. First for oneself.”
–Steve

“Physically: aerobic exercise, volleyball, ice hockey, cycling, sailing. Emotionally: unfortunately I have to work to ‘not care’ about people or situations which may end painfully. Along the lines of ‘attachment is the source of suffering’, so best to avoid it or limit its scope. Sad though because it could also be the source of great joy. Is it worth the risk?“
–Rainer

“It's time for my heart to be nurtured on one level yet contained on another. To go easy on me and to allow my feelings to be validated, not judged harshly. On the other hand, to let the heart rule with equanimity and not lead the mind and body around like a master.”
–Suzanne

“I spend time thinking of everything I am grateful for, and I try to develop my ability to express compassion for myself and others without reservation. I take time to do the things I need to do to keep myself healthy and happy. This includes taking experiential workshops, fostering relationships, and participating within groups which have a similar interest to become a more compassionate and fulfilled being.“
–Peter

“Self-forgiveness for my own judgments. And oh yeah, coming to Esalen.”
–David B.

“Hmm, this is a tough one! I guess I take care of my heart through fostering relationships with people I feel connected to. Spending quality time with them (whether we're on the phone, through messages/letters, on Zoom, or in-person). Being there for them, listening to them, sharing what's going on with me, my struggles and my successes... like we do in the Esalen weekly Friends of Esalen Zoom sessions!”
–Lori

“I remind myself in many ways of the fact that " Love is all there is!" LOVE is the prize and this one precious life is the stage we get to learn our lessons. I get out into nature, hike, camp, river kayak, fly fish, garden, I create, I dance (not enough!), and I remain grateful for each day, each breath, each moment. Being in the moment, awake, and remembering the gift of life and my feeling of gratitude for all of creation.”
–Steven
“My physical heart by limiting stress and eating a heart-healthy diet. My emotional heart by staying in love with the world and by knowing that all disappointment and loss will pass.“
–David Z.


Today, September 29, is World Heart Day. Strike up a conversation with your own heart and as you feel comfortable, encourage others to do the same. As part of our own transformations and self-care, we sometimes ask for others to illuminate and enliven our hearts or speak our love language.

What if we could do this for ourselves too, even if just for today… or to start a heart practice, forever?



About

Esalen Team

Vegetarian Nori Rolls with Organic Gourmet Leslie Cerier

About

Esalen Team

Darnell Lamont Walker leading Rituals Writing Workshop
Category:
Food

Gourmet organic chef and author Leslie Cerier will be teaching two workshops at Esalen this month. The weekend workshop, Delicious Meals in Minutes Fresh from the Esalen Garden (wait list only), will feature Esalen’s own fresh produce and herbs in nutritious and delicious meals. A week-long workshop, Improvisational Cooking for Health and Vitality (limited availability in standard accommodations), will delve even deeper into creative cooking.

Leslie shares a favorite recipe that will be included in her workshops, a vegetarian twist on sushi. Here’s how you can make your very own Nori Rice Rolls with Ginger Tofu.

You’ll need:

  • 4 cups Exotic Rice Blend (recipe follows)
  • 1 tablespoon light sesame oil
  • 1 tablespoon tamari
  • 1 tablespoon grated fresh ginger
  • 14 ounces extra-firm tofu, sliced into long rectangles about 1/2 inch thick
  • 2 cups grated beets
  • 1 cup grated carrots
  • 8 sheets toasted nori
  • 2 to 3 tablespoons umeboshi paste
  • 2 tablespoons wasabi powder, or more as needed
  • 2 tablespoons water
  • Tamari

Make Exotic Rice Blend (see below). While rice cools, heat oil, tamari and ginger in a medium-size skillet over medium heat. Add tofu and fry for 3 to 5 minutes on each side, until golden brown on both sides. (You may need to fry the tofu in a couple rounds.) Slice tofu slabs into thirds to make long strips.

Mix beets and carrots in a bowl.

Lay a sushi mat on a clean work surface with bamboo strips running horizontally. Place a nori piece on the mat, shiny side down. Spread about 1/2 cup rice on the nori, leaving the top 1 1/2 inches bare. Lay 2 or 3 tofu strips across the rice, horizontally, followed by some carrot-beet mixture. Gently press filling into rice. Spread some umeboshi paste over the top inch of the nori.

Starting at the end closest to you and using even pressure, use the sushi mat to roll the nori tightly and evenly around the rice and fillings. Be sure to pull the leading edge of the mat back so it doesn’t get incorporated into the roll. Once complete, give the mat a gentle squeeze along its entire length, then let the nori roll sit inside the mat for a minute to ensure a tight roll. Gently unroll the mat and use a very sharp serrated knife to slice the roll into 8 rounds. Repeat with remaining ingredients.

Put wasabi powder and water in a small bowl and stir to form a paste. For a thinner, less pungent dip, add a little more water.

To serve, place wasabi bowl in the center of a platter and surround it with the sushi rounds. Provide small bowls for tamari.

Variations: Feel free to swap ginger tempeh, hemp seeds and/or black sesame seeds for the tofu. You can swap other veggies, too. Makes 8 nori rolls.

Exotic Rice Blend

Cooking with black forbidden rice or Bhutanese red rice adds color to nori rolls, making them a feast for the eyes as well as the palate.

You’ll need:

  • 1 1/2 cups black forbidden rice or Bhutanese red rice
  • 1/2 cup sweet brown rice, rinsed
  • 4 cups cold water
  • Pinch of sea salt

Combine rice, water and salt in a large saucepan over medium-high heat. Bring to a boil; lower heat, cover and simmer for 30 to 40 minutes until all water is absorbed. Uncover rice and let stand for about 1 hour, until cool enough to handle, before making nori rolls.

Reprinted with permission from Gluten-Free Recipes for the Conscious Cook by Leslie Cerier (2010, New Harbinger Publications).

“Remembering to be as self compassionate as I can and praying to the divine that we're all a part of.” 
–Aaron

“Prayer, reading, meditation, walking.”
–Karen
“Erratically — which is an ongoing stream of practice to find peace.”
–Charles
“Try on a daily basis to be kind to myself and to realize that making mistakes is a part of the human condition. Learning from our mistakes is a journey. But it starts with compassion and caring. First for oneself.”
–Steve

“Physically: aerobic exercise, volleyball, ice hockey, cycling, sailing. Emotionally: unfortunately I have to work to ‘not care’ about people or situations which may end painfully. Along the lines of ‘attachment is the source of suffering’, so best to avoid it or limit its scope. Sad though because it could also be the source of great joy. Is it worth the risk?“
–Rainer

“It's time for my heart to be nurtured on one level yet contained on another. To go easy on me and to allow my feelings to be validated, not judged harshly. On the other hand, to let the heart rule with equanimity and not lead the mind and body around like a master.”
–Suzanne

“I spend time thinking of everything I am grateful for, and I try to develop my ability to express compassion for myself and others without reservation. I take time to do the things I need to do to keep myself healthy and happy. This includes taking experiential workshops, fostering relationships, and participating within groups which have a similar interest to become a more compassionate and fulfilled being.“
–Peter

“Self-forgiveness for my own judgments. And oh yeah, coming to Esalen.”
–David B.

“Hmm, this is a tough one! I guess I take care of my heart through fostering relationships with people I feel connected to. Spending quality time with them (whether we're on the phone, through messages/letters, on Zoom, or in-person). Being there for them, listening to them, sharing what's going on with me, my struggles and my successes... like we do in the Esalen weekly Friends of Esalen Zoom sessions!”
–Lori

“I remind myself in many ways of the fact that " Love is all there is!" LOVE is the prize and this one precious life is the stage we get to learn our lessons. I get out into nature, hike, camp, river kayak, fly fish, garden, I create, I dance (not enough!), and I remain grateful for each day, each breath, each moment. Being in the moment, awake, and remembering the gift of life and my feeling of gratitude for all of creation.”
–Steven
“My physical heart by limiting stress and eating a heart-healthy diet. My emotional heart by staying in love with the world and by knowing that all disappointment and loss will pass.“
–David Z.


Today, September 29, is World Heart Day. Strike up a conversation with your own heart and as you feel comfortable, encourage others to do the same. As part of our own transformations and self-care, we sometimes ask for others to illuminate and enliven our hearts or speak our love language.

What if we could do this for ourselves too, even if just for today… or to start a heart practice, forever?



About

Esalen Team

Darnell Lamont Walker leading Rituals Writing Workshop
Vegetarian Nori Rolls with Organic Gourmet Leslie Cerier
Category:
Food

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About

Esalen Team

Vegetarian Nori Rolls with Organic Gourmet Leslie Cerier

About

Esalen Team

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