The Parallel Journey with LaVerne McLeod

Darnell Lamont Walker leading Rituals Writing Workshop

The journey toward becoming your best self is a parallel adventure. It starts with becoming an ally within yourself. That means working on your Self and partnering with your Self before venturing to help others as an ally or collaborator. The change must begin with you, on your own, and that is like a sacred passage to know that you can be the catalyst, the instrument, and, eventually, the helping accomplice. 

Allies move beyond awareness that biases are real and want to help change things. Becoming a true ally means working as an advocate for those experiencing oppressions.

If you are already an ally, be open to looking closely at some unconscionable atrocities involving Black, Indigenous, People of Color (BIPOC), LGBTQIA, homeless persons, and gender diverse persons. You can likely do more to reach your higher potential, for yourself and those affected by oppression. 

When we expand to becoming collaborators, we reach even further to help others and confront crises with equanimity and a sense of belonging. A collaborator actively takes part in change and directly works alongside communities and organizations they support.

Here are some ways to prepare to enhance your allyship:

  1. Make a choice to consciously look beyond your comfortable existence and see the pain in the world that you might want to lessen and the situations you might be able to uplift. Even if you don't know how, decide to consciously look beyond your cozy life and see what's happening in the world that you might wish to decrease.
  1. Keep life fresh and interesting by trying new things and getting to know new people outside your circle of friends.

  2.  Try accepting this diverse world with all its various people, languages, and pronouns, even if they are not what you are used to.
  1. Start to create a new vision, a fresh perspective for the world that you have never thought about or had before.
  1. Let go of something you might normally compete with and try instead to cooperate with it (be it a person or thing).
  1. In situations where you see a person (or people) experiencing separation and exclusion, find a way to include that person(s) in your activity. Show that you care.
  1. Share enthusiasm. The cliche is true: It’s contagious.
  1. Earn trust by not revealing secrets entrusted to you.

By practicing these things, we can be ready to work side-by-side with others, reach a higher potential, become our best selves, and help inspire more people to do the same.

“Remembering to be as self compassionate as I can and praying to the divine that we're all a part of.” 
–Aaron

“Prayer, reading, meditation, walking.”
–Karen
“Erratically — which is an ongoing stream of practice to find peace.”
–Charles
“Try on a daily basis to be kind to myself and to realize that making mistakes is a part of the human condition. Learning from our mistakes is a journey. But it starts with compassion and caring. First for oneself.”
–Steve

“Physically: aerobic exercise, volleyball, ice hockey, cycling, sailing. Emotionally: unfortunately I have to work to ‘not care’ about people or situations which may end painfully. Along the lines of ‘attachment is the source of suffering’, so best to avoid it or limit its scope. Sad though because it could also be the source of great joy. Is it worth the risk?“
–Rainer

“It's time for my heart to be nurtured on one level yet contained on another. To go easy on me and to allow my feelings to be validated, not judged harshly. On the other hand, to let the heart rule with equanimity and not lead the mind and body around like a master.”
–Suzanne

“I spend time thinking of everything I am grateful for, and I try to develop my ability to express compassion for myself and others without reservation. I take time to do the things I need to do to keep myself healthy and happy. This includes taking experiential workshops, fostering relationships, and participating within groups which have a similar interest to become a more compassionate and fulfilled being.“
–Peter

“Self-forgiveness for my own judgments. And oh yeah, coming to Esalen.”
–David B.

“Hmm, this is a tough one! I guess I take care of my heart through fostering relationships with people I feel connected to. Spending quality time with them (whether we're on the phone, through messages/letters, on Zoom, or in-person). Being there for them, listening to them, sharing what's going on with me, my struggles and my successes... like we do in the Esalen weekly Friends of Esalen Zoom sessions!”
–Lori

“I remind myself in many ways of the fact that " Love is all there is!" LOVE is the prize and this one precious life is the stage we get to learn our lessons. I get out into nature, hike, camp, river kayak, fly fish, garden, I create, I dance (not enough!), and I remain grateful for each day, each breath, each moment. Being in the moment, awake, and remembering the gift of life and my feeling of gratitude for all of creation.”
–Steven
“My physical heart by limiting stress and eating a heart-healthy diet. My emotional heart by staying in love with the world and by knowing that all disappointment and loss will pass.“
–David Z.


Today, September 29, is World Heart Day. Strike up a conversation with your own heart and as you feel comfortable, encourage others to do the same. As part of our own transformations and self-care, we sometimes ask for others to illuminate and enliven our hearts or speak our love language.

What if we could do this for ourselves too, even if just for today… or to start a heart practice, forever?


Join LaVerne McLeod from September 22-24 for Be Your Best Self: Moving from Ally to Collaborator.

Learn More

About

LaVerne McLeod

LaVerne McLeod is the founder of Purple Feather Press and the creator and facilitator of Bridge Building to Equity workshops. She is the author of Corn Hollow, a fiction book that draws on her experiences growing up in the American South during the rise of the Civil Rights movement. She has a non-fiction book that is soon to be released.

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< Back to all Journal posts

Darnell Lamont Walker leading Rituals Writing Workshop
The Parallel Journey with LaVerne McLeod

The journey toward becoming your best self is a parallel adventure. It starts with becoming an ally within yourself. That means working on your Self and partnering with your Self before venturing to help others as an ally or collaborator. The change must begin with you, on your own, and that is like a sacred passage to know that you can be the catalyst, the instrument, and, eventually, the helping accomplice. 

Allies move beyond awareness that biases are real and want to help change things. Becoming a true ally means working as an advocate for those experiencing oppressions.

If you are already an ally, be open to looking closely at some unconscionable atrocities involving Black, Indigenous, People of Color (BIPOC), LGBTQIA, homeless persons, and gender diverse persons. You can likely do more to reach your higher potential, for yourself and those affected by oppression. 

When we expand to becoming collaborators, we reach even further to help others and confront crises with equanimity and a sense of belonging. A collaborator actively takes part in change and directly works alongside communities and organizations they support.

Here are some ways to prepare to enhance your allyship:

  1. Make a choice to consciously look beyond your comfortable existence and see the pain in the world that you might want to lessen and the situations you might be able to uplift. Even if you don't know how, decide to consciously look beyond your cozy life and see what's happening in the world that you might wish to decrease.
  1. Keep life fresh and interesting by trying new things and getting to know new people outside your circle of friends.

  2.  Try accepting this diverse world with all its various people, languages, and pronouns, even if they are not what you are used to.
  1. Start to create a new vision, a fresh perspective for the world that you have never thought about or had before.
  1. Let go of something you might normally compete with and try instead to cooperate with it (be it a person or thing).
  1. In situations where you see a person (or people) experiencing separation and exclusion, find a way to include that person(s) in your activity. Show that you care.
  1. Share enthusiasm. The cliche is true: It’s contagious.
  1. Earn trust by not revealing secrets entrusted to you.

By practicing these things, we can be ready to work side-by-side with others, reach a higher potential, become our best selves, and help inspire more people to do the same.

“Remembering to be as self compassionate as I can and praying to the divine that we're all a part of.” 
–Aaron

“Prayer, reading, meditation, walking.”
–Karen
“Erratically — which is an ongoing stream of practice to find peace.”
–Charles
“Try on a daily basis to be kind to myself and to realize that making mistakes is a part of the human condition. Learning from our mistakes is a journey. But it starts with compassion and caring. First for oneself.”
–Steve

“Physically: aerobic exercise, volleyball, ice hockey, cycling, sailing. Emotionally: unfortunately I have to work to ‘not care’ about people or situations which may end painfully. Along the lines of ‘attachment is the source of suffering’, so best to avoid it or limit its scope. Sad though because it could also be the source of great joy. Is it worth the risk?“
–Rainer

“It's time for my heart to be nurtured on one level yet contained on another. To go easy on me and to allow my feelings to be validated, not judged harshly. On the other hand, to let the heart rule with equanimity and not lead the mind and body around like a master.”
–Suzanne

“I spend time thinking of everything I am grateful for, and I try to develop my ability to express compassion for myself and others without reservation. I take time to do the things I need to do to keep myself healthy and happy. This includes taking experiential workshops, fostering relationships, and participating within groups which have a similar interest to become a more compassionate and fulfilled being.“
–Peter

“Self-forgiveness for my own judgments. And oh yeah, coming to Esalen.”
–David B.

“Hmm, this is a tough one! I guess I take care of my heart through fostering relationships with people I feel connected to. Spending quality time with them (whether we're on the phone, through messages/letters, on Zoom, or in-person). Being there for them, listening to them, sharing what's going on with me, my struggles and my successes... like we do in the Esalen weekly Friends of Esalen Zoom sessions!”
–Lori

“I remind myself in many ways of the fact that " Love is all there is!" LOVE is the prize and this one precious life is the stage we get to learn our lessons. I get out into nature, hike, camp, river kayak, fly fish, garden, I create, I dance (not enough!), and I remain grateful for each day, each breath, each moment. Being in the moment, awake, and remembering the gift of life and my feeling of gratitude for all of creation.”
–Steven
“My physical heart by limiting stress and eating a heart-healthy diet. My emotional heart by staying in love with the world and by knowing that all disappointment and loss will pass.“
–David Z.


Today, September 29, is World Heart Day. Strike up a conversation with your own heart and as you feel comfortable, encourage others to do the same. As part of our own transformations and self-care, we sometimes ask for others to illuminate and enliven our hearts or speak our love language.

What if we could do this for ourselves too, even if just for today… or to start a heart practice, forever?


Join LaVerne McLeod from September 22-24 for Be Your Best Self: Moving from Ally to Collaborator.

Learn More

About

LaVerne McLeod

LaVerne McLeod is the founder of Purple Feather Press and the creator and facilitator of Bridge Building to Equity workshops. She is the author of Corn Hollow, a fiction book that draws on her experiences growing up in the American South during the rise of the Civil Rights movement. She has a non-fiction book that is soon to be released.

The Parallel Journey with LaVerne McLeod

About

LaVerne McLeod

LaVerne McLeod is the founder of Purple Feather Press and the creator and facilitator of Bridge Building to Equity workshops. She is the author of Corn Hollow, a fiction book that draws on her experiences growing up in the American South during the rise of the Civil Rights movement. She has a non-fiction book that is soon to be released.

< Back to all articles

Darnell Lamont Walker leading Rituals Writing Workshop

The journey toward becoming your best self is a parallel adventure. It starts with becoming an ally within yourself. That means working on your Self and partnering with your Self before venturing to help others as an ally or collaborator. The change must begin with you, on your own, and that is like a sacred passage to know that you can be the catalyst, the instrument, and, eventually, the helping accomplice. 

Allies move beyond awareness that biases are real and want to help change things. Becoming a true ally means working as an advocate for those experiencing oppressions.

If you are already an ally, be open to looking closely at some unconscionable atrocities involving Black, Indigenous, People of Color (BIPOC), LGBTQIA, homeless persons, and gender diverse persons. You can likely do more to reach your higher potential, for yourself and those affected by oppression. 

When we expand to becoming collaborators, we reach even further to help others and confront crises with equanimity and a sense of belonging. A collaborator actively takes part in change and directly works alongside communities and organizations they support.

Here are some ways to prepare to enhance your allyship:

  1. Make a choice to consciously look beyond your comfortable existence and see the pain in the world that you might want to lessen and the situations you might be able to uplift. Even if you don't know how, decide to consciously look beyond your cozy life and see what's happening in the world that you might wish to decrease.
  1. Keep life fresh and interesting by trying new things and getting to know new people outside your circle of friends.

  2.  Try accepting this diverse world with all its various people, languages, and pronouns, even if they are not what you are used to.
  1. Start to create a new vision, a fresh perspective for the world that you have never thought about or had before.
  1. Let go of something you might normally compete with and try instead to cooperate with it (be it a person or thing).
  1. In situations where you see a person (or people) experiencing separation and exclusion, find a way to include that person(s) in your activity. Show that you care.
  1. Share enthusiasm. The cliche is true: It’s contagious.
  1. Earn trust by not revealing secrets entrusted to you.

By practicing these things, we can be ready to work side-by-side with others, reach a higher potential, become our best selves, and help inspire more people to do the same.

“Remembering to be as self compassionate as I can and praying to the divine that we're all a part of.” 
–Aaron

“Prayer, reading, meditation, walking.”
–Karen
“Erratically — which is an ongoing stream of practice to find peace.”
–Charles
“Try on a daily basis to be kind to myself and to realize that making mistakes is a part of the human condition. Learning from our mistakes is a journey. But it starts with compassion and caring. First for oneself.”
–Steve

“Physically: aerobic exercise, volleyball, ice hockey, cycling, sailing. Emotionally: unfortunately I have to work to ‘not care’ about people or situations which may end painfully. Along the lines of ‘attachment is the source of suffering’, so best to avoid it or limit its scope. Sad though because it could also be the source of great joy. Is it worth the risk?“
–Rainer

“It's time for my heart to be nurtured on one level yet contained on another. To go easy on me and to allow my feelings to be validated, not judged harshly. On the other hand, to let the heart rule with equanimity and not lead the mind and body around like a master.”
–Suzanne

“I spend time thinking of everything I am grateful for, and I try to develop my ability to express compassion for myself and others without reservation. I take time to do the things I need to do to keep myself healthy and happy. This includes taking experiential workshops, fostering relationships, and participating within groups which have a similar interest to become a more compassionate and fulfilled being.“
–Peter

“Self-forgiveness for my own judgments. And oh yeah, coming to Esalen.”
–David B.

“Hmm, this is a tough one! I guess I take care of my heart through fostering relationships with people I feel connected to. Spending quality time with them (whether we're on the phone, through messages/letters, on Zoom, or in-person). Being there for them, listening to them, sharing what's going on with me, my struggles and my successes... like we do in the Esalen weekly Friends of Esalen Zoom sessions!”
–Lori

“I remind myself in many ways of the fact that " Love is all there is!" LOVE is the prize and this one precious life is the stage we get to learn our lessons. I get out into nature, hike, camp, river kayak, fly fish, garden, I create, I dance (not enough!), and I remain grateful for each day, each breath, each moment. Being in the moment, awake, and remembering the gift of life and my feeling of gratitude for all of creation.”
–Steven
“My physical heart by limiting stress and eating a heart-healthy diet. My emotional heart by staying in love with the world and by knowing that all disappointment and loss will pass.“
–David Z.


Today, September 29, is World Heart Day. Strike up a conversation with your own heart and as you feel comfortable, encourage others to do the same. As part of our own transformations and self-care, we sometimes ask for others to illuminate and enliven our hearts or speak our love language.

What if we could do this for ourselves too, even if just for today… or to start a heart practice, forever?


Join LaVerne McLeod from September 22-24 for Be Your Best Self: Moving from Ally to Collaborator.

Learn More

About

LaVerne McLeod

LaVerne McLeod is the founder of Purple Feather Press and the creator and facilitator of Bridge Building to Equity workshops. She is the author of Corn Hollow, a fiction book that draws on her experiences growing up in the American South during the rise of the Civil Rights movement. She has a non-fiction book that is soon to be released.

< Back to all Journal posts

Darnell Lamont Walker leading Rituals Writing Workshop
The Parallel Journey with LaVerne McLeod

The journey toward becoming your best self is a parallel adventure. It starts with becoming an ally within yourself. That means working on your Self and partnering with your Self before venturing to help others as an ally or collaborator. The change must begin with you, on your own, and that is like a sacred passage to know that you can be the catalyst, the instrument, and, eventually, the helping accomplice. 

Allies move beyond awareness that biases are real and want to help change things. Becoming a true ally means working as an advocate for those experiencing oppressions.

If you are already an ally, be open to looking closely at some unconscionable atrocities involving Black, Indigenous, People of Color (BIPOC), LGBTQIA, homeless persons, and gender diverse persons. You can likely do more to reach your higher potential, for yourself and those affected by oppression. 

When we expand to becoming collaborators, we reach even further to help others and confront crises with equanimity and a sense of belonging. A collaborator actively takes part in change and directly works alongside communities and organizations they support.

Here are some ways to prepare to enhance your allyship:

  1. Make a choice to consciously look beyond your comfortable existence and see the pain in the world that you might want to lessen and the situations you might be able to uplift. Even if you don't know how, decide to consciously look beyond your cozy life and see what's happening in the world that you might wish to decrease.
  1. Keep life fresh and interesting by trying new things and getting to know new people outside your circle of friends.

  2.  Try accepting this diverse world with all its various people, languages, and pronouns, even if they are not what you are used to.
  1. Start to create a new vision, a fresh perspective for the world that you have never thought about or had before.
  1. Let go of something you might normally compete with and try instead to cooperate with it (be it a person or thing).
  1. In situations where you see a person (or people) experiencing separation and exclusion, find a way to include that person(s) in your activity. Show that you care.
  1. Share enthusiasm. The cliche is true: It’s contagious.
  1. Earn trust by not revealing secrets entrusted to you.

By practicing these things, we can be ready to work side-by-side with others, reach a higher potential, become our best selves, and help inspire more people to do the same.

“Remembering to be as self compassionate as I can and praying to the divine that we're all a part of.” 
–Aaron

“Prayer, reading, meditation, walking.”
–Karen
“Erratically — which is an ongoing stream of practice to find peace.”
–Charles
“Try on a daily basis to be kind to myself and to realize that making mistakes is a part of the human condition. Learning from our mistakes is a journey. But it starts with compassion and caring. First for oneself.”
–Steve

“Physically: aerobic exercise, volleyball, ice hockey, cycling, sailing. Emotionally: unfortunately I have to work to ‘not care’ about people or situations which may end painfully. Along the lines of ‘attachment is the source of suffering’, so best to avoid it or limit its scope. Sad though because it could also be the source of great joy. Is it worth the risk?“
–Rainer

“It's time for my heart to be nurtured on one level yet contained on another. To go easy on me and to allow my feelings to be validated, not judged harshly. On the other hand, to let the heart rule with equanimity and not lead the mind and body around like a master.”
–Suzanne

“I spend time thinking of everything I am grateful for, and I try to develop my ability to express compassion for myself and others without reservation. I take time to do the things I need to do to keep myself healthy and happy. This includes taking experiential workshops, fostering relationships, and participating within groups which have a similar interest to become a more compassionate and fulfilled being.“
–Peter

“Self-forgiveness for my own judgments. And oh yeah, coming to Esalen.”
–David B.

“Hmm, this is a tough one! I guess I take care of my heart through fostering relationships with people I feel connected to. Spending quality time with them (whether we're on the phone, through messages/letters, on Zoom, or in-person). Being there for them, listening to them, sharing what's going on with me, my struggles and my successes... like we do in the Esalen weekly Friends of Esalen Zoom sessions!”
–Lori

“I remind myself in many ways of the fact that " Love is all there is!" LOVE is the prize and this one precious life is the stage we get to learn our lessons. I get out into nature, hike, camp, river kayak, fly fish, garden, I create, I dance (not enough!), and I remain grateful for each day, each breath, each moment. Being in the moment, awake, and remembering the gift of life and my feeling of gratitude for all of creation.”
–Steven
“My physical heart by limiting stress and eating a heart-healthy diet. My emotional heart by staying in love with the world and by knowing that all disappointment and loss will pass.“
–David Z.


Today, September 29, is World Heart Day. Strike up a conversation with your own heart and as you feel comfortable, encourage others to do the same. As part of our own transformations and self-care, we sometimes ask for others to illuminate and enliven our hearts or speak our love language.

What if we could do this for ourselves too, even if just for today… or to start a heart practice, forever?


Join LaVerne McLeod from September 22-24 for Be Your Best Self: Moving from Ally to Collaborator.

Learn More

About

LaVerne McLeod

LaVerne McLeod is the founder of Purple Feather Press and the creator and facilitator of Bridge Building to Equity workshops. She is the author of Corn Hollow, a fiction book that draws on her experiences growing up in the American South during the rise of the Civil Rights movement. She has a non-fiction book that is soon to be released.

The Parallel Journey with LaVerne McLeod

About

LaVerne McLeod

LaVerne McLeod is the founder of Purple Feather Press and the creator and facilitator of Bridge Building to Equity workshops. She is the author of Corn Hollow, a fiction book that draws on her experiences growing up in the American South during the rise of the Civil Rights movement. She has a non-fiction book that is soon to be released.

< Back to all articles

Darnell Lamont Walker leading Rituals Writing Workshop

The journey toward becoming your best self is a parallel adventure. It starts with becoming an ally within yourself. That means working on your Self and partnering with your Self before venturing to help others as an ally or collaborator. The change must begin with you, on your own, and that is like a sacred passage to know that you can be the catalyst, the instrument, and, eventually, the helping accomplice. 

Allies move beyond awareness that biases are real and want to help change things. Becoming a true ally means working as an advocate for those experiencing oppressions.

If you are already an ally, be open to looking closely at some unconscionable atrocities involving Black, Indigenous, People of Color (BIPOC), LGBTQIA, homeless persons, and gender diverse persons. You can likely do more to reach your higher potential, for yourself and those affected by oppression. 

When we expand to becoming collaborators, we reach even further to help others and confront crises with equanimity and a sense of belonging. A collaborator actively takes part in change and directly works alongside communities and organizations they support.

Here are some ways to prepare to enhance your allyship:

  1. Make a choice to consciously look beyond your comfortable existence and see the pain in the world that you might want to lessen and the situations you might be able to uplift. Even if you don't know how, decide to consciously look beyond your cozy life and see what's happening in the world that you might wish to decrease.
  1. Keep life fresh and interesting by trying new things and getting to know new people outside your circle of friends.

  2.  Try accepting this diverse world with all its various people, languages, and pronouns, even if they are not what you are used to.
  1. Start to create a new vision, a fresh perspective for the world that you have never thought about or had before.
  1. Let go of something you might normally compete with and try instead to cooperate with it (be it a person or thing).
  1. In situations where you see a person (or people) experiencing separation and exclusion, find a way to include that person(s) in your activity. Show that you care.
  1. Share enthusiasm. The cliche is true: It’s contagious.
  1. Earn trust by not revealing secrets entrusted to you.

By practicing these things, we can be ready to work side-by-side with others, reach a higher potential, become our best selves, and help inspire more people to do the same.

“Remembering to be as self compassionate as I can and praying to the divine that we're all a part of.” 
–Aaron

“Prayer, reading, meditation, walking.”
–Karen
“Erratically — which is an ongoing stream of practice to find peace.”
–Charles
“Try on a daily basis to be kind to myself and to realize that making mistakes is a part of the human condition. Learning from our mistakes is a journey. But it starts with compassion and caring. First for oneself.”
–Steve

“Physically: aerobic exercise, volleyball, ice hockey, cycling, sailing. Emotionally: unfortunately I have to work to ‘not care’ about people or situations which may end painfully. Along the lines of ‘attachment is the source of suffering’, so best to avoid it or limit its scope. Sad though because it could also be the source of great joy. Is it worth the risk?“
–Rainer

“It's time for my heart to be nurtured on one level yet contained on another. To go easy on me and to allow my feelings to be validated, not judged harshly. On the other hand, to let the heart rule with equanimity and not lead the mind and body around like a master.”
–Suzanne

“I spend time thinking of everything I am grateful for, and I try to develop my ability to express compassion for myself and others without reservation. I take time to do the things I need to do to keep myself healthy and happy. This includes taking experiential workshops, fostering relationships, and participating within groups which have a similar interest to become a more compassionate and fulfilled being.“
–Peter

“Self-forgiveness for my own judgments. And oh yeah, coming to Esalen.”
–David B.

“Hmm, this is a tough one! I guess I take care of my heart through fostering relationships with people I feel connected to. Spending quality time with them (whether we're on the phone, through messages/letters, on Zoom, or in-person). Being there for them, listening to them, sharing what's going on with me, my struggles and my successes... like we do in the Esalen weekly Friends of Esalen Zoom sessions!”
–Lori

“I remind myself in many ways of the fact that " Love is all there is!" LOVE is the prize and this one precious life is the stage we get to learn our lessons. I get out into nature, hike, camp, river kayak, fly fish, garden, I create, I dance (not enough!), and I remain grateful for each day, each breath, each moment. Being in the moment, awake, and remembering the gift of life and my feeling of gratitude for all of creation.”
–Steven
“My physical heart by limiting stress and eating a heart-healthy diet. My emotional heart by staying in love with the world and by knowing that all disappointment and loss will pass.“
–David Z.


Today, September 29, is World Heart Day. Strike up a conversation with your own heart and as you feel comfortable, encourage others to do the same. As part of our own transformations and self-care, we sometimes ask for others to illuminate and enliven our hearts or speak our love language.

What if we could do this for ourselves too, even if just for today… or to start a heart practice, forever?


Join LaVerne McLeod from September 22-24 for Be Your Best Self: Moving from Ally to Collaborator.

Learn More

About

LaVerne McLeod

LaVerne McLeod is the founder of Purple Feather Press and the creator and facilitator of Bridge Building to Equity workshops. She is the author of Corn Hollow, a fiction book that draws on her experiences growing up in the American South during the rise of the Civil Rights movement. She has a non-fiction book that is soon to be released.