Darnell Lamont Walker leading Rituals Writing Workshop
Springtime Inspiration From Esalen’s Farm & Garden

Spring is normally a time for optimism in the Esalen Farm & Garden, and despite the current uncertainty in our world, Farm & Garden Supervisor Chris Omer prepares soil beds with the trust that seeds will take root.

“In farming, we’re always faced with uncertainty beyond our control based on weather, pests, access to water, disease and more,” Chris says. “But with COVID-19, we still are determined to grow as much food for our community as possible while adjusting our plans when needed according to this ever-changing world.”

For many of you who may be safe at home, we turned to Chris for suggestions on planting a home garden.

Chris adheres to a golden rule: grow what you love to eat. “It's simple advice and yields the most satisfying results,” he says. “At Esalen, we’re planting our main staples—salad greens, kale, chard, carrots, Asian greens, turnips, radish, cabbage, fennel, herbs and an assortment of flowers. But we always try and experiment, which keeps the growing exciting and provides more variety in the kitchen.”

The crew is already seeing the first of many other shoots rising from the soil—asparagus, garlic and elderberry cuttings.

As for our own home gardens, Chris says one of the best things to plant is herbs. “The classic home herb garden starts with rosemary, thyme, oregano, sage, mint and parsley,” he shares. “But you could also include lemongrass, ginger, turmeric and a wide variety of medicinal herbs depending on your climate.

These herbs fit well into a landscape and generally work well in containers for people who don't have access to a large yard.”

For those of us who may have started our spring gardening later than usual this year, there’s still time to plant seeds. For an immediate source of healthy greens, consider growing sprouts or microgreens. This method allows us to grow highly dense seedlings that are harvested at an immature state yet can be very beneficial.

“Microgreens are highly nutritious and tasty and they only take between seven to 14 days before they are ready to eat,” Chris explains. “You could even let them grow back in for a second and possibly a third cutting. This can also be a great project for homeschooling kids and I recommend starting with peas, sunflower, arugula, kale, Chinese mustard or bok choy.”

With Earth Day approaching, this is also an ideal time to honor the source of all life. In fact, Chris is in the process of creating a special ceremony at Esalen that offers gratitude and reverence to Mother Earth and the many people who have tended to the land in the past.

“In our case, we honor the rich lineage of farmers and gardeners, and all of our elders past and present,” Chris says.

“Remembering to be as self compassionate as I can and praying to the divine that we're all a part of.” 
–Aaron

“Prayer, reading, meditation, walking.”
–Karen
“Erratically — which is an ongoing stream of practice to find peace.”
–Charles
“Try on a daily basis to be kind to myself and to realize that making mistakes is a part of the human condition. Learning from our mistakes is a journey. But it starts with compassion and caring. First for oneself.”
–Steve

“Physically: aerobic exercise, volleyball, ice hockey, cycling, sailing. Emotionally: unfortunately I have to work to ‘not care’ about people or situations which may end painfully. Along the lines of ‘attachment is the source of suffering’, so best to avoid it or limit its scope. Sad though because it could also be the source of great joy. Is it worth the risk?“
–Rainer

“It's time for my heart to be nurtured on one level yet contained on another. To go easy on me and to allow my feelings to be validated, not judged harshly. On the other hand, to let the heart rule with equanimity and not lead the mind and body around like a master.”
–Suzanne

“I spend time thinking of everything I am grateful for, and I try to develop my ability to express compassion for myself and others without reservation. I take time to do the things I need to do to keep myself healthy and happy. This includes taking experiential workshops, fostering relationships, and participating within groups which have a similar interest to become a more compassionate and fulfilled being.“
–Peter

“Self-forgiveness for my own judgments. And oh yeah, coming to Esalen.”
–David B.

“Hmm, this is a tough one! I guess I take care of my heart through fostering relationships with people I feel connected to. Spending quality time with them (whether we're on the phone, through messages/letters, on Zoom, or in-person). Being there for them, listening to them, sharing what's going on with me, my struggles and my successes... like we do in the Esalen weekly Friends of Esalen Zoom sessions!”
–Lori

“I remind myself in many ways of the fact that " Love is all there is!" LOVE is the prize and this one precious life is the stage we get to learn our lessons. I get out into nature, hike, camp, river kayak, fly fish, garden, I create, I dance (not enough!), and I remain grateful for each day, each breath, each moment. Being in the moment, awake, and remembering the gift of life and my feeling of gratitude for all of creation.”
–Steven
“My physical heart by limiting stress and eating a heart-healthy diet. My emotional heart by staying in love with the world and by knowing that all disappointment and loss will pass.“
–David Z.


Today, September 29, is World Heart Day. Strike up a conversation with your own heart and as you feel comfortable, encourage others to do the same. As part of our own transformations and self-care, we sometimes ask for others to illuminate and enliven our hearts or speak our love language.

What if we could do this for ourselves too, even if just for today… or to start a heart practice, forever?



About

Esalen Team

Springtime Inspiration From Esalen’s Farm & Garden

About

Esalen Team

Darnell Lamont Walker leading Rituals Writing Workshop

Spring is normally a time for optimism in the Esalen Farm & Garden, and despite the current uncertainty in our world, Farm & Garden Supervisor Chris Omer prepares soil beds with the trust that seeds will take root.

“In farming, we’re always faced with uncertainty beyond our control based on weather, pests, access to water, disease and more,” Chris says. “But with COVID-19, we still are determined to grow as much food for our community as possible while adjusting our plans when needed according to this ever-changing world.”

For many of you who may be safe at home, we turned to Chris for suggestions on planting a home garden.

Chris adheres to a golden rule: grow what you love to eat. “It's simple advice and yields the most satisfying results,” he says. “At Esalen, we’re planting our main staples—salad greens, kale, chard, carrots, Asian greens, turnips, radish, cabbage, fennel, herbs and an assortment of flowers. But we always try and experiment, which keeps the growing exciting and provides more variety in the kitchen.”

The crew is already seeing the first of many other shoots rising from the soil—asparagus, garlic and elderberry cuttings.

As for our own home gardens, Chris says one of the best things to plant is herbs. “The classic home herb garden starts with rosemary, thyme, oregano, sage, mint and parsley,” he shares. “But you could also include lemongrass, ginger, turmeric and a wide variety of medicinal herbs depending on your climate.

These herbs fit well into a landscape and generally work well in containers for people who don't have access to a large yard.”

For those of us who may have started our spring gardening later than usual this year, there’s still time to plant seeds. For an immediate source of healthy greens, consider growing sprouts or microgreens. This method allows us to grow highly dense seedlings that are harvested at an immature state yet can be very beneficial.

“Microgreens are highly nutritious and tasty and they only take between seven to 14 days before they are ready to eat,” Chris explains. “You could even let them grow back in for a second and possibly a third cutting. This can also be a great project for homeschooling kids and I recommend starting with peas, sunflower, arugula, kale, Chinese mustard or bok choy.”

With Earth Day approaching, this is also an ideal time to honor the source of all life. In fact, Chris is in the process of creating a special ceremony at Esalen that offers gratitude and reverence to Mother Earth and the many people who have tended to the land in the past.

“In our case, we honor the rich lineage of farmers and gardeners, and all of our elders past and present,” Chris says.

“Remembering to be as self compassionate as I can and praying to the divine that we're all a part of.” 
–Aaron

“Prayer, reading, meditation, walking.”
–Karen
“Erratically — which is an ongoing stream of practice to find peace.”
–Charles
“Try on a daily basis to be kind to myself and to realize that making mistakes is a part of the human condition. Learning from our mistakes is a journey. But it starts with compassion and caring. First for oneself.”
–Steve

“Physically: aerobic exercise, volleyball, ice hockey, cycling, sailing. Emotionally: unfortunately I have to work to ‘not care’ about people or situations which may end painfully. Along the lines of ‘attachment is the source of suffering’, so best to avoid it or limit its scope. Sad though because it could also be the source of great joy. Is it worth the risk?“
–Rainer

“It's time for my heart to be nurtured on one level yet contained on another. To go easy on me and to allow my feelings to be validated, not judged harshly. On the other hand, to let the heart rule with equanimity and not lead the mind and body around like a master.”
–Suzanne

“I spend time thinking of everything I am grateful for, and I try to develop my ability to express compassion for myself and others without reservation. I take time to do the things I need to do to keep myself healthy and happy. This includes taking experiential workshops, fostering relationships, and participating within groups which have a similar interest to become a more compassionate and fulfilled being.“
–Peter

“Self-forgiveness for my own judgments. And oh yeah, coming to Esalen.”
–David B.

“Hmm, this is a tough one! I guess I take care of my heart through fostering relationships with people I feel connected to. Spending quality time with them (whether we're on the phone, through messages/letters, on Zoom, or in-person). Being there for them, listening to them, sharing what's going on with me, my struggles and my successes... like we do in the Esalen weekly Friends of Esalen Zoom sessions!”
–Lori

“I remind myself in many ways of the fact that " Love is all there is!" LOVE is the prize and this one precious life is the stage we get to learn our lessons. I get out into nature, hike, camp, river kayak, fly fish, garden, I create, I dance (not enough!), and I remain grateful for each day, each breath, each moment. Being in the moment, awake, and remembering the gift of life and my feeling of gratitude for all of creation.”
–Steven
“My physical heart by limiting stress and eating a heart-healthy diet. My emotional heart by staying in love with the world and by knowing that all disappointment and loss will pass.“
–David Z.


Today, September 29, is World Heart Day. Strike up a conversation with your own heart and as you feel comfortable, encourage others to do the same. As part of our own transformations and self-care, we sometimes ask for others to illuminate and enliven our hearts or speak our love language.

What if we could do this for ourselves too, even if just for today… or to start a heart practice, forever?



About

Esalen Team

Darnell Lamont Walker leading Rituals Writing Workshop
Springtime Inspiration From Esalen’s Farm & Garden

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About

Esalen Team

Springtime Inspiration From Esalen’s Farm & Garden

About

Esalen Team

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