Darnell Lamont Walker leading Rituals Writing Workshop
Photo and recipe courtesy of Michelle Weber
Pea Shoot, Asparagus, and Blood Orange Salad
Category:
Food

It’s hard to go wrong with flavor combinations when you pair things that come into season together, like early spring’s pea shoots and asparagus bolstered with the last of winter’s citrus. This salad is spring green on a plate, with a delightful mix of flavors and textures — acidic citrus, bright mint, sweet peas, crunchy nuts, tender asparagus — that elevate it beyond an everyday salad.

The fruits and vegetables require a bit of prep; sink into the meditative rhythms of peeling and chopping for some personal time, and then celebrate your labors by sharing the bounty with loved ones. Add some toasted crusty bread smeared with goat cheese and sprinkled with more chopped nuts or a piece of pan-seared fish with additional citrus squeezed over it to round out your meal.


Pea Shoot, Asparagus, and Blood Orange Salad

Serves four as a side dish

Ingredients

  • 3 blood oranges (regular oranges are also fine, as are grapefruits!)
  • 1 bunch asparagus
  • A large bowl of ice
  • 4 large handfuls of pea shoots
  • 1 handful of fresh mint leaves
  • 1/2 c. toasted, chopped hazelnuts
  • 1 1/2 tbsp. champagne vinegar
  • 1/3 c. olive oil
  • Salt

Directions

  1. Trim the oranges: Cut the fruit into supremes. Squeeze the orange rinds and remaining flesh over a bowl, aiming to get 2 tablespoons of juice. Waste not want not!
  2. Trim the asparagus: Trim off the tough ends by holding one end of a stalk in each hand and bending it until it snaps, then trimming all the other stalks to the same length. Then, use a vegetable peeler to shave the stalks into ribbons. 
  3. Blanch the asparagus: Put a pot of water on to boil and get your bowl of ice. When the water comes to a boil, add tablespoon of salt, then add the asparagus. Cook the asparagus for 10 seconds, then remove and plunge it right into the ice to stop the cooking. Drain completely.
  4. Make the dressing: Stir the reserved blood orange juice and vinegar together with a pinch of salt. Slowly pour in the olive oil, whisking.
  5. Chop or tear up the mint leaves (always cut up mint at the last minute to ensure it doesn’t brown and wilt before you need it.)
  6. Assemble the salad: In a large bowl, toss the pea shoots with the asparagus, orange supremes, mint, and hazelnuts, then toss the whole salad with the dressing — start with a few tablespoons, and add more to taste.

Serve immediately.

“Remembering to be as self compassionate as I can and praying to the divine that we're all a part of.” 
–Aaron

“Prayer, reading, meditation, walking.”
–Karen
“Erratically — which is an ongoing stream of practice to find peace.”
–Charles
“Try on a daily basis to be kind to myself and to realize that making mistakes is a part of the human condition. Learning from our mistakes is a journey. But it starts with compassion and caring. First for oneself.”
–Steve

“Physically: aerobic exercise, volleyball, ice hockey, cycling, sailing. Emotionally: unfortunately I have to work to ‘not care’ about people or situations which may end painfully. Along the lines of ‘attachment is the source of suffering’, so best to avoid it or limit its scope. Sad though because it could also be the source of great joy. Is it worth the risk?“
–Rainer

“It's time for my heart to be nurtured on one level yet contained on another. To go easy on me and to allow my feelings to be validated, not judged harshly. On the other hand, to let the heart rule with equanimity and not lead the mind and body around like a master.”
–Suzanne

“I spend time thinking of everything I am grateful for, and I try to develop my ability to express compassion for myself and others without reservation. I take time to do the things I need to do to keep myself healthy and happy. This includes taking experiential workshops, fostering relationships, and participating within groups which have a similar interest to become a more compassionate and fulfilled being.“
–Peter

“Self-forgiveness for my own judgments. And oh yeah, coming to Esalen.”
–David B.

“Hmm, this is a tough one! I guess I take care of my heart through fostering relationships with people I feel connected to. Spending quality time with them (whether we're on the phone, through messages/letters, on Zoom, or in-person). Being there for them, listening to them, sharing what's going on with me, my struggles and my successes... like we do in the Esalen weekly Friends of Esalen Zoom sessions!”
–Lori

“I remind myself in many ways of the fact that " Love is all there is!" LOVE is the prize and this one precious life is the stage we get to learn our lessons. I get out into nature, hike, camp, river kayak, fly fish, garden, I create, I dance (not enough!), and I remain grateful for each day, each breath, each moment. Being in the moment, awake, and remembering the gift of life and my feeling of gratitude for all of creation.”
–Steven
“My physical heart by limiting stress and eating a heart-healthy diet. My emotional heart by staying in love with the world and by knowing that all disappointment and loss will pass.“
–David Z.


Today, September 29, is World Heart Day. Strike up a conversation with your own heart and as you feel comfortable, encourage others to do the same. As part of our own transformations and self-care, we sometimes ask for others to illuminate and enliven our hearts or speak our love language.

What if we could do this for ourselves too, even if just for today… or to start a heart practice, forever?



About

Esalen Team

Pea Shoot, Asparagus, and Blood Orange Salad

About

Esalen Team

Darnell Lamont Walker leading Rituals Writing Workshop
Photo and recipe courtesy of Michelle Weber
Category:
Food

It’s hard to go wrong with flavor combinations when you pair things that come into season together, like early spring’s pea shoots and asparagus bolstered with the last of winter’s citrus. This salad is spring green on a plate, with a delightful mix of flavors and textures — acidic citrus, bright mint, sweet peas, crunchy nuts, tender asparagus — that elevate it beyond an everyday salad.

The fruits and vegetables require a bit of prep; sink into the meditative rhythms of peeling and chopping for some personal time, and then celebrate your labors by sharing the bounty with loved ones. Add some toasted crusty bread smeared with goat cheese and sprinkled with more chopped nuts or a piece of pan-seared fish with additional citrus squeezed over it to round out your meal.


Pea Shoot, Asparagus, and Blood Orange Salad

Serves four as a side dish

Ingredients

  • 3 blood oranges (regular oranges are also fine, as are grapefruits!)
  • 1 bunch asparagus
  • A large bowl of ice
  • 4 large handfuls of pea shoots
  • 1 handful of fresh mint leaves
  • 1/2 c. toasted, chopped hazelnuts
  • 1 1/2 tbsp. champagne vinegar
  • 1/3 c. olive oil
  • Salt

Directions

  1. Trim the oranges: Cut the fruit into supremes. Squeeze the orange rinds and remaining flesh over a bowl, aiming to get 2 tablespoons of juice. Waste not want not!
  2. Trim the asparagus: Trim off the tough ends by holding one end of a stalk in each hand and bending it until it snaps, then trimming all the other stalks to the same length. Then, use a vegetable peeler to shave the stalks into ribbons. 
  3. Blanch the asparagus: Put a pot of water on to boil and get your bowl of ice. When the water comes to a boil, add tablespoon of salt, then add the asparagus. Cook the asparagus for 10 seconds, then remove and plunge it right into the ice to stop the cooking. Drain completely.
  4. Make the dressing: Stir the reserved blood orange juice and vinegar together with a pinch of salt. Slowly pour in the olive oil, whisking.
  5. Chop or tear up the mint leaves (always cut up mint at the last minute to ensure it doesn’t brown and wilt before you need it.)
  6. Assemble the salad: In a large bowl, toss the pea shoots with the asparagus, orange supremes, mint, and hazelnuts, then toss the whole salad with the dressing — start with a few tablespoons, and add more to taste.

Serve immediately.

“Remembering to be as self compassionate as I can and praying to the divine that we're all a part of.” 
–Aaron

“Prayer, reading, meditation, walking.”
–Karen
“Erratically — which is an ongoing stream of practice to find peace.”
–Charles
“Try on a daily basis to be kind to myself and to realize that making mistakes is a part of the human condition. Learning from our mistakes is a journey. But it starts with compassion and caring. First for oneself.”
–Steve

“Physically: aerobic exercise, volleyball, ice hockey, cycling, sailing. Emotionally: unfortunately I have to work to ‘not care’ about people or situations which may end painfully. Along the lines of ‘attachment is the source of suffering’, so best to avoid it or limit its scope. Sad though because it could also be the source of great joy. Is it worth the risk?“
–Rainer

“It's time for my heart to be nurtured on one level yet contained on another. To go easy on me and to allow my feelings to be validated, not judged harshly. On the other hand, to let the heart rule with equanimity and not lead the mind and body around like a master.”
–Suzanne

“I spend time thinking of everything I am grateful for, and I try to develop my ability to express compassion for myself and others without reservation. I take time to do the things I need to do to keep myself healthy and happy. This includes taking experiential workshops, fostering relationships, and participating within groups which have a similar interest to become a more compassionate and fulfilled being.“
–Peter

“Self-forgiveness for my own judgments. And oh yeah, coming to Esalen.”
–David B.

“Hmm, this is a tough one! I guess I take care of my heart through fostering relationships with people I feel connected to. Spending quality time with them (whether we're on the phone, through messages/letters, on Zoom, or in-person). Being there for them, listening to them, sharing what's going on with me, my struggles and my successes... like we do in the Esalen weekly Friends of Esalen Zoom sessions!”
–Lori

“I remind myself in many ways of the fact that " Love is all there is!" LOVE is the prize and this one precious life is the stage we get to learn our lessons. I get out into nature, hike, camp, river kayak, fly fish, garden, I create, I dance (not enough!), and I remain grateful for each day, each breath, each moment. Being in the moment, awake, and remembering the gift of life and my feeling of gratitude for all of creation.”
–Steven
“My physical heart by limiting stress and eating a heart-healthy diet. My emotional heart by staying in love with the world and by knowing that all disappointment and loss will pass.“
–David Z.


Today, September 29, is World Heart Day. Strike up a conversation with your own heart and as you feel comfortable, encourage others to do the same. As part of our own transformations and self-care, we sometimes ask for others to illuminate and enliven our hearts or speak our love language.

What if we could do this for ourselves too, even if just for today… or to start a heart practice, forever?



About

Esalen Team

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