Darnell Lamont Walker leading Rituals Writing Workshop
Free Online Screening of David Bohm Documentary Offered to Esalen Community

“Consciousness is never static or complete but is an unending process of movement and unfoldment,” noted David Bohm, the late American scientist and theoretical physicist of the 20th century whose unorthodox ideas to quantum theory, neuropsychology and the philosophy of mind are given the spotlight in Infinite Potential: The Life and Ideas of David Bohm.

Directed by Paul Howard, the compelling documentary was scheduled to be screened at the Esalen Inspirational Festival this year before the pandemic forced many events to be postponed. Now, the Fetzer Memorial Trust is offering a free online screening on June 20 to the Esalen community.

"The time has come to reexamine the profound ideas of David Bohm, who said that we are all interconnected and that our individual consciousness co-creates the world we inhabit, which has radical implications with respect to how we live life on this planet and coexist with one another,” says Esalen Inspirational Film Festival Co-founder Corinne Bourdeau.

Bohm was profoundly influential. Albert Einstein called him his “spiritual son.” The Dalai Lama relied upon him as his “science guru.” But Bohm and his work were rarely reported on. “Bohm believed that nature has an infinite quality,” observes Howard.

“He merges into his physics profound ideas which have been known for millennia by the mystical traditions of the east, a realization that the whole Universe is contained in each part of the universe and that all of time is contained in each and every passing moment. A wholeness that is held together by consciousness itself.”

Bohm grew up in a poor Pennsylvania coal mining town during the Great Depression and he possessed a maverick-like intelligence that often baffled his parents and peers. After receiving a college scholarship, he got the attention of the greatest minds in science, including Robert Oppenheimer, the father of the Atomic Bomb, who became his thesis advisor.

Howard’s documentary reveals how Oppenheimer would later turn on Bohm and how his explorations led him to intuit a hidden order to reality––the Quantum Potential––that underlies both the microscopic world of subatomic particles and also the macro world of stars and galaxies.

Bohm’s interest in Eastern thought and the wisdom traditions of India also gave him an opportunity to talk more freely about what underlies all of creation––a realm that mystics have known about for millennia and modern science is only just beginning to explore.

As the documentary points out, Bohm’s ideas were revolutionary, ahead of their time and sometimes considered a threat to the scientific orthodoxy. It was one of the reasons why Bohm was ultimately dismissed.

Flashforward to this century and Bohm’s work is suddenly of interest. University College London and the University of Toronto are conducting experiments to prove the existence of the Quantum Potential, which Bohm proposed, could revolutionize human thought and our relationship to the planet.

Through the use of hypnotic music and rich visual tapestries, Howard weaves together Bohm’s fascinating tale by interviewing luminaries such as the Dalai Lama, artist Antony Gormley, Oxford philosopher and physicist Sir Roger Penrose, and many others.

Click here to watch the Infinite Potential trailer and to register for the free screening June 20. Can’t attend on the screening date? No worries. You will still be able to receive a link to see the film for free.

Learn more at infinitepotential.com.

“Remembering to be as self compassionate as I can and praying to the divine that we're all a part of.” 
–Aaron

“Prayer, reading, meditation, walking.”
–Karen
“Erratically — which is an ongoing stream of practice to find peace.”
–Charles
“Try on a daily basis to be kind to myself and to realize that making mistakes is a part of the human condition. Learning from our mistakes is a journey. But it starts with compassion and caring. First for oneself.”
–Steve

“Physically: aerobic exercise, volleyball, ice hockey, cycling, sailing. Emotionally: unfortunately I have to work to ‘not care’ about people or situations which may end painfully. Along the lines of ‘attachment is the source of suffering’, so best to avoid it or limit its scope. Sad though because it could also be the source of great joy. Is it worth the risk?“
–Rainer

“It's time for my heart to be nurtured on one level yet contained on another. To go easy on me and to allow my feelings to be validated, not judged harshly. On the other hand, to let the heart rule with equanimity and not lead the mind and body around like a master.”
–Suzanne

“I spend time thinking of everything I am grateful for, and I try to develop my ability to express compassion for myself and others without reservation. I take time to do the things I need to do to keep myself healthy and happy. This includes taking experiential workshops, fostering relationships, and participating within groups which have a similar interest to become a more compassionate and fulfilled being.“
–Peter

“Self-forgiveness for my own judgments. And oh yeah, coming to Esalen.”
–David B.

“Hmm, this is a tough one! I guess I take care of my heart through fostering relationships with people I feel connected to. Spending quality time with them (whether we're on the phone, through messages/letters, on Zoom, or in-person). Being there for them, listening to them, sharing what's going on with me, my struggles and my successes... like we do in the Esalen weekly Friends of Esalen Zoom sessions!”
–Lori

“I remind myself in many ways of the fact that " Love is all there is!" LOVE is the prize and this one precious life is the stage we get to learn our lessons. I get out into nature, hike, camp, river kayak, fly fish, garden, I create, I dance (not enough!), and I remain grateful for each day, each breath, each moment. Being in the moment, awake, and remembering the gift of life and my feeling of gratitude for all of creation.”
–Steven
“My physical heart by limiting stress and eating a heart-healthy diet. My emotional heart by staying in love with the world and by knowing that all disappointment and loss will pass.“
–David Z.


Today, September 29, is World Heart Day. Strike up a conversation with your own heart and as you feel comfortable, encourage others to do the same. As part of our own transformations and self-care, we sometimes ask for others to illuminate and enliven our hearts or speak our love language.

What if we could do this for ourselves too, even if just for today… or to start a heart practice, forever?



About

Esalen Team

Free Online Screening of David Bohm Documentary Offered to Esalen Community

About

Esalen Team

Darnell Lamont Walker leading Rituals Writing Workshop

“Consciousness is never static or complete but is an unending process of movement and unfoldment,” noted David Bohm, the late American scientist and theoretical physicist of the 20th century whose unorthodox ideas to quantum theory, neuropsychology and the philosophy of mind are given the spotlight in Infinite Potential: The Life and Ideas of David Bohm.

Directed by Paul Howard, the compelling documentary was scheduled to be screened at the Esalen Inspirational Festival this year before the pandemic forced many events to be postponed. Now, the Fetzer Memorial Trust is offering a free online screening on June 20 to the Esalen community.

"The time has come to reexamine the profound ideas of David Bohm, who said that we are all interconnected and that our individual consciousness co-creates the world we inhabit, which has radical implications with respect to how we live life on this planet and coexist with one another,” says Esalen Inspirational Film Festival Co-founder Corinne Bourdeau.

Bohm was profoundly influential. Albert Einstein called him his “spiritual son.” The Dalai Lama relied upon him as his “science guru.” But Bohm and his work were rarely reported on. “Bohm believed that nature has an infinite quality,” observes Howard.

“He merges into his physics profound ideas which have been known for millennia by the mystical traditions of the east, a realization that the whole Universe is contained in each part of the universe and that all of time is contained in each and every passing moment. A wholeness that is held together by consciousness itself.”

Bohm grew up in a poor Pennsylvania coal mining town during the Great Depression and he possessed a maverick-like intelligence that often baffled his parents and peers. After receiving a college scholarship, he got the attention of the greatest minds in science, including Robert Oppenheimer, the father of the Atomic Bomb, who became his thesis advisor.

Howard’s documentary reveals how Oppenheimer would later turn on Bohm and how his explorations led him to intuit a hidden order to reality––the Quantum Potential––that underlies both the microscopic world of subatomic particles and also the macro world of stars and galaxies.

Bohm’s interest in Eastern thought and the wisdom traditions of India also gave him an opportunity to talk more freely about what underlies all of creation––a realm that mystics have known about for millennia and modern science is only just beginning to explore.

As the documentary points out, Bohm’s ideas were revolutionary, ahead of their time and sometimes considered a threat to the scientific orthodoxy. It was one of the reasons why Bohm was ultimately dismissed.

Flashforward to this century and Bohm’s work is suddenly of interest. University College London and the University of Toronto are conducting experiments to prove the existence of the Quantum Potential, which Bohm proposed, could revolutionize human thought and our relationship to the planet.

Through the use of hypnotic music and rich visual tapestries, Howard weaves together Bohm’s fascinating tale by interviewing luminaries such as the Dalai Lama, artist Antony Gormley, Oxford philosopher and physicist Sir Roger Penrose, and many others.

Click here to watch the Infinite Potential trailer and to register for the free screening June 20. Can’t attend on the screening date? No worries. You will still be able to receive a link to see the film for free.

Learn more at infinitepotential.com.

“Remembering to be as self compassionate as I can and praying to the divine that we're all a part of.” 
–Aaron

“Prayer, reading, meditation, walking.”
–Karen
“Erratically — which is an ongoing stream of practice to find peace.”
–Charles
“Try on a daily basis to be kind to myself and to realize that making mistakes is a part of the human condition. Learning from our mistakes is a journey. But it starts with compassion and caring. First for oneself.”
–Steve

“Physically: aerobic exercise, volleyball, ice hockey, cycling, sailing. Emotionally: unfortunately I have to work to ‘not care’ about people or situations which may end painfully. Along the lines of ‘attachment is the source of suffering’, so best to avoid it or limit its scope. Sad though because it could also be the source of great joy. Is it worth the risk?“
–Rainer

“It's time for my heart to be nurtured on one level yet contained on another. To go easy on me and to allow my feelings to be validated, not judged harshly. On the other hand, to let the heart rule with equanimity and not lead the mind and body around like a master.”
–Suzanne

“I spend time thinking of everything I am grateful for, and I try to develop my ability to express compassion for myself and others without reservation. I take time to do the things I need to do to keep myself healthy and happy. This includes taking experiential workshops, fostering relationships, and participating within groups which have a similar interest to become a more compassionate and fulfilled being.“
–Peter

“Self-forgiveness for my own judgments. And oh yeah, coming to Esalen.”
–David B.

“Hmm, this is a tough one! I guess I take care of my heart through fostering relationships with people I feel connected to. Spending quality time with them (whether we're on the phone, through messages/letters, on Zoom, or in-person). Being there for them, listening to them, sharing what's going on with me, my struggles and my successes... like we do in the Esalen weekly Friends of Esalen Zoom sessions!”
–Lori

“I remind myself in many ways of the fact that " Love is all there is!" LOVE is the prize and this one precious life is the stage we get to learn our lessons. I get out into nature, hike, camp, river kayak, fly fish, garden, I create, I dance (not enough!), and I remain grateful for each day, each breath, each moment. Being in the moment, awake, and remembering the gift of life and my feeling of gratitude for all of creation.”
–Steven
“My physical heart by limiting stress and eating a heart-healthy diet. My emotional heart by staying in love with the world and by knowing that all disappointment and loss will pass.“
–David Z.


Today, September 29, is World Heart Day. Strike up a conversation with your own heart and as you feel comfortable, encourage others to do the same. As part of our own transformations and self-care, we sometimes ask for others to illuminate and enliven our hearts or speak our love language.

What if we could do this for ourselves too, even if just for today… or to start a heart practice, forever?



About

Esalen Team

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