Darnell Lamont Walker leading Rituals Writing Workshop
Esalen Reads: What's on Kari Bernardi's Nightstand?

We delve into books for so many different reasons: guidance, knowledge, curiosity and oftentimes to lose ourselves in a captivating tale that can take us to the farthest stretches of our imagination. Esalen News invites our faculty to share what’s on their nightstand and why.

For more than 30 years, Esalen faculty Kari Bernardi has shared her culinary prowess to help people thrive on a plant-based diet. As the owner of Super Natural Foods Company and co-director of Living Light International, she brings her wisdom to Esalen in Exploring Plant-Based Eating June 19-21. She shares her latest book find with Esalen News.

Esalen News: What was the last book you read?

Kari Bernardi: The Life-changing Magic of Tidying Up by Marie Kondo.

What drew you to the book?

Marie Kondo is an internationally recognized consultant who teaches the Japanese art of decluttering and organizing. A few of my friends were watching her TV show, Tidying Up, and one of them loaned me her book.

What inspires you about the book?

It is an extremely inspiring read, especially if you are ready and committed to de-clutter your life. It guided me to clear out and make room for what “sparks joy.” The book inspired me to walk through each category of clutter I had collected and apply Marie’s methods. I learned to honor the history of an item and become complete with it by thanking and releasing it. Even though I was completely inspired, it has been no small undertaking to go through my belongings and take the time needed to let go of a lot of them. I now really enjoy the things I truly love to have around me and I am free from caring for things that I do not need or want—and that freedom was inspired from the book.

What are several things that really stood out?

It is a very small-sized book filled with so much good information. Marie speaks to you in the book and shares stories of workshops and clients and refers to personal stories to make her points clear. The KonMari method Marie is famous for is unique and really works to get organized once and for all.

She offers a step-by-step teaching tool to help regain order in the home. Personally, it stood out to me how many things I had held onto from my childhood and moved around to all of the homes I have lived in since. Thanks to this book my next move will be free of clutter and unnecessary past accumulations.

What other things have you learned?

I learned how to easily release clothes (and fold and hang the ones that I kept correctly), shoes, books, paperwork and extra stuff that I had held onto for decades. Marie’s teachings guided me to let go and make room to enjoy my life right now and have more space to breathe and relax.

I learned to apply the KonMari method of releasing what doesn't spark joy in my life and was freed from a lot of wanting and it also decreased my need to fill up space. Another thing I learned was a little nugget of wisdom: “the question of what you want to own is actually a question of how you want to live your life.”

How would you sum up the book in a word or two?

Super powerful.

“Remembering to be as self compassionate as I can and praying to the divine that we're all a part of.” 
–Aaron

“Prayer, reading, meditation, walking.”
–Karen
“Erratically — which is an ongoing stream of practice to find peace.”
–Charles
“Try on a daily basis to be kind to myself and to realize that making mistakes is a part of the human condition. Learning from our mistakes is a journey. But it starts with compassion and caring. First for oneself.”
–Steve

“Physically: aerobic exercise, volleyball, ice hockey, cycling, sailing. Emotionally: unfortunately I have to work to ‘not care’ about people or situations which may end painfully. Along the lines of ‘attachment is the source of suffering’, so best to avoid it or limit its scope. Sad though because it could also be the source of great joy. Is it worth the risk?“
–Rainer

“It's time for my heart to be nurtured on one level yet contained on another. To go easy on me and to allow my feelings to be validated, not judged harshly. On the other hand, to let the heart rule with equanimity and not lead the mind and body around like a master.”
–Suzanne

“I spend time thinking of everything I am grateful for, and I try to develop my ability to express compassion for myself and others without reservation. I take time to do the things I need to do to keep myself healthy and happy. This includes taking experiential workshops, fostering relationships, and participating within groups which have a similar interest to become a more compassionate and fulfilled being.“
–Peter

“Self-forgiveness for my own judgments. And oh yeah, coming to Esalen.”
–David B.

“Hmm, this is a tough one! I guess I take care of my heart through fostering relationships with people I feel connected to. Spending quality time with them (whether we're on the phone, through messages/letters, on Zoom, or in-person). Being there for them, listening to them, sharing what's going on with me, my struggles and my successes... like we do in the Esalen weekly Friends of Esalen Zoom sessions!”
–Lori

“I remind myself in many ways of the fact that " Love is all there is!" LOVE is the prize and this one precious life is the stage we get to learn our lessons. I get out into nature, hike, camp, river kayak, fly fish, garden, I create, I dance (not enough!), and I remain grateful for each day, each breath, each moment. Being in the moment, awake, and remembering the gift of life and my feeling of gratitude for all of creation.”
–Steven
“My physical heart by limiting stress and eating a heart-healthy diet. My emotional heart by staying in love with the world and by knowing that all disappointment and loss will pass.“
–David Z.


Today, September 29, is World Heart Day. Strike up a conversation with your own heart and as you feel comfortable, encourage others to do the same. As part of our own transformations and self-care, we sometimes ask for others to illuminate and enliven our hearts or speak our love language.

What if we could do this for ourselves too, even if just for today… or to start a heart practice, forever?



About

Esalen Team

Esalen Reads: What's on Kari Bernardi's Nightstand?

About

Esalen Team

Darnell Lamont Walker leading Rituals Writing Workshop

We delve into books for so many different reasons: guidance, knowledge, curiosity and oftentimes to lose ourselves in a captivating tale that can take us to the farthest stretches of our imagination. Esalen News invites our faculty to share what’s on their nightstand and why.

For more than 30 years, Esalen faculty Kari Bernardi has shared her culinary prowess to help people thrive on a plant-based diet. As the owner of Super Natural Foods Company and co-director of Living Light International, she brings her wisdom to Esalen in Exploring Plant-Based Eating June 19-21. She shares her latest book find with Esalen News.

Esalen News: What was the last book you read?

Kari Bernardi: The Life-changing Magic of Tidying Up by Marie Kondo.

What drew you to the book?

Marie Kondo is an internationally recognized consultant who teaches the Japanese art of decluttering and organizing. A few of my friends were watching her TV show, Tidying Up, and one of them loaned me her book.

What inspires you about the book?

It is an extremely inspiring read, especially if you are ready and committed to de-clutter your life. It guided me to clear out and make room for what “sparks joy.” The book inspired me to walk through each category of clutter I had collected and apply Marie’s methods. I learned to honor the history of an item and become complete with it by thanking and releasing it. Even though I was completely inspired, it has been no small undertaking to go through my belongings and take the time needed to let go of a lot of them. I now really enjoy the things I truly love to have around me and I am free from caring for things that I do not need or want—and that freedom was inspired from the book.

What are several things that really stood out?

It is a very small-sized book filled with so much good information. Marie speaks to you in the book and shares stories of workshops and clients and refers to personal stories to make her points clear. The KonMari method Marie is famous for is unique and really works to get organized once and for all.

She offers a step-by-step teaching tool to help regain order in the home. Personally, it stood out to me how many things I had held onto from my childhood and moved around to all of the homes I have lived in since. Thanks to this book my next move will be free of clutter and unnecessary past accumulations.

What other things have you learned?

I learned how to easily release clothes (and fold and hang the ones that I kept correctly), shoes, books, paperwork and extra stuff that I had held onto for decades. Marie’s teachings guided me to let go and make room to enjoy my life right now and have more space to breathe and relax.

I learned to apply the KonMari method of releasing what doesn't spark joy in my life and was freed from a lot of wanting and it also decreased my need to fill up space. Another thing I learned was a little nugget of wisdom: “the question of what you want to own is actually a question of how you want to live your life.”

How would you sum up the book in a word or two?

Super powerful.

“Remembering to be as self compassionate as I can and praying to the divine that we're all a part of.” 
–Aaron

“Prayer, reading, meditation, walking.”
–Karen
“Erratically — which is an ongoing stream of practice to find peace.”
–Charles
“Try on a daily basis to be kind to myself and to realize that making mistakes is a part of the human condition. Learning from our mistakes is a journey. But it starts with compassion and caring. First for oneself.”
–Steve

“Physically: aerobic exercise, volleyball, ice hockey, cycling, sailing. Emotionally: unfortunately I have to work to ‘not care’ about people or situations which may end painfully. Along the lines of ‘attachment is the source of suffering’, so best to avoid it or limit its scope. Sad though because it could also be the source of great joy. Is it worth the risk?“
–Rainer

“It's time for my heart to be nurtured on one level yet contained on another. To go easy on me and to allow my feelings to be validated, not judged harshly. On the other hand, to let the heart rule with equanimity and not lead the mind and body around like a master.”
–Suzanne

“I spend time thinking of everything I am grateful for, and I try to develop my ability to express compassion for myself and others without reservation. I take time to do the things I need to do to keep myself healthy and happy. This includes taking experiential workshops, fostering relationships, and participating within groups which have a similar interest to become a more compassionate and fulfilled being.“
–Peter

“Self-forgiveness for my own judgments. And oh yeah, coming to Esalen.”
–David B.

“Hmm, this is a tough one! I guess I take care of my heart through fostering relationships with people I feel connected to. Spending quality time with them (whether we're on the phone, through messages/letters, on Zoom, or in-person). Being there for them, listening to them, sharing what's going on with me, my struggles and my successes... like we do in the Esalen weekly Friends of Esalen Zoom sessions!”
–Lori

“I remind myself in many ways of the fact that " Love is all there is!" LOVE is the prize and this one precious life is the stage we get to learn our lessons. I get out into nature, hike, camp, river kayak, fly fish, garden, I create, I dance (not enough!), and I remain grateful for each day, each breath, each moment. Being in the moment, awake, and remembering the gift of life and my feeling of gratitude for all of creation.”
–Steven
“My physical heart by limiting stress and eating a heart-healthy diet. My emotional heart by staying in love with the world and by knowing that all disappointment and loss will pass.“
–David Z.


Today, September 29, is World Heart Day. Strike up a conversation with your own heart and as you feel comfortable, encourage others to do the same. As part of our own transformations and self-care, we sometimes ask for others to illuminate and enliven our hearts or speak our love language.

What if we could do this for ourselves too, even if just for today… or to start a heart practice, forever?



About

Esalen Team

//