Darnell Lamont Walker leading Rituals Writing Workshop
Esalen Harvest Milk
Category:
Food

Inspired by a walk through the Farm & Garden as farmers harvested for Thanksgiving dinner, this spiced nut milk is infused with the spirit of Esalen. Warm and nourishing for the body and mind, Harvest Milk is luxuriously creamy on its own, makes a great base for smoothies and is wonderful in a latte.

This recipe makes about six cups.

Ingredients

  • 1 cup raw almonds
  • 1 cup raw cashews
  • 12-15 fresh culinary sage leaves (set a few aside for when you're ready to serve)
  • 1/2 tbsp. cinnamon, extra to sprinkle upon serving
  • 1/2 tbsp. vanilla bean paste (can be substituted with real vanilla extract)
  • 2 oz. pure maple (dark amber Grade A) for sweetener to taste
  • Water to soak, blend and thin



Equipment

  • Measuring cup and spoons
  • Blender
  • 1 to 2 large glass containers with airtight lids
  • Fine mesh nut milk bag
  • Large saucepan
  • Whisk


Method

  1. Place nuts in a glass container and add water until they are covered by one inch. Cover the container to seal and let sit in the refrigerator for at least 12 hours or up to two days. This is key for creating a smooth, silky texture.
  2. Once nuts are thoroughly soaked, drain and discard the liquid. Rinse nuts thoroughly with cold water.
  3. Purée one cup of the soaked nuts with three cups of hot water (not boiling) in a blender on high speed until the mixture is smooth. This can take about 45-60 seconds. Line a saucepan with the nut milk bag, then pour mixture into the bag and let strain through. Repeat the blending step with the remaining nuts and pour that into the bag as well. Gather the open end of the nut milk bag around the mixture and twist closed. With clean hands, squeeze and press the mixture, extracting as much liquid as possible into the saucepan. The remaining pulp can be refrigerated and used within three days as meal/flour for raw or baked recipes.
  4. Place the saucepan over a burner and turn it to medium heat. Add in sage leaves and cinnamon. Whisk the mixture and simmer for approximately 30-45 minutes, whisking again every few minutes. If mixture begins to boil and bubble up, turn the burner down to a lower heat for the remaining time. The liquid will reduce slightly. Rinse nut milk bag to use again in the next step.
  5. Turn burner off and allow the nut milk to cool for five minutes. Line a clean glass container with the rinsed nut milk bag and pour contents of the saucepan into the bag to strain out the sage leaves. Be careful, as your milk may still be hot! You may want to add a bit of cold water to cool and to reach desired nut milk consistency. Add in vanilla bean paste and sweeten to taste with maple. Whisk to thoroughly combine.


You can enjoy this deliciously nourishing Harvest Milk warm or transfer it to an airtight container and refrigerate to enjoy later. It is best enjoyed within three to four days.  

When you are ready to serve, whisk to recombine. Rub a leaf of Sage around the rim of each glass to release a bit of the aroma, then pour Harvest Milk into the glass. Sprinkle with extra cinnamon and take a moment to close your eyes. Imagine walking through Esalen's beautiful Farm & Garden, your fingers brushing the sage bushes. Take a deep breath in...and out...and drink up!

“Remembering to be as self compassionate as I can and praying to the divine that we're all a part of.” 
–Aaron

“Prayer, reading, meditation, walking.”
–Karen
“Erratically — which is an ongoing stream of practice to find peace.”
–Charles
“Try on a daily basis to be kind to myself and to realize that making mistakes is a part of the human condition. Learning from our mistakes is a journey. But it starts with compassion and caring. First for oneself.”
–Steve

“Physically: aerobic exercise, volleyball, ice hockey, cycling, sailing. Emotionally: unfortunately I have to work to ‘not care’ about people or situations which may end painfully. Along the lines of ‘attachment is the source of suffering’, so best to avoid it or limit its scope. Sad though because it could also be the source of great joy. Is it worth the risk?“
–Rainer

“It's time for my heart to be nurtured on one level yet contained on another. To go easy on me and to allow my feelings to be validated, not judged harshly. On the other hand, to let the heart rule with equanimity and not lead the mind and body around like a master.”
–Suzanne

“I spend time thinking of everything I am grateful for, and I try to develop my ability to express compassion for myself and others without reservation. I take time to do the things I need to do to keep myself healthy and happy. This includes taking experiential workshops, fostering relationships, and participating within groups which have a similar interest to become a more compassionate and fulfilled being.“
–Peter

“Self-forgiveness for my own judgments. And oh yeah, coming to Esalen.”
–David B.

“Hmm, this is a tough one! I guess I take care of my heart through fostering relationships with people I feel connected to. Spending quality time with them (whether we're on the phone, through messages/letters, on Zoom, or in-person). Being there for them, listening to them, sharing what's going on with me, my struggles and my successes... like we do in the Esalen weekly Friends of Esalen Zoom sessions!”
–Lori

“I remind myself in many ways of the fact that " Love is all there is!" LOVE is the prize and this one precious life is the stage we get to learn our lessons. I get out into nature, hike, camp, river kayak, fly fish, garden, I create, I dance (not enough!), and I remain grateful for each day, each breath, each moment. Being in the moment, awake, and remembering the gift of life and my feeling of gratitude for all of creation.”
–Steven
“My physical heart by limiting stress and eating a heart-healthy diet. My emotional heart by staying in love with the world and by knowing that all disappointment and loss will pass.“
–David Z.


Today, September 29, is World Heart Day. Strike up a conversation with your own heart and as you feel comfortable, encourage others to do the same. As part of our own transformations and self-care, we sometimes ask for others to illuminate and enliven our hearts or speak our love language.

What if we could do this for ourselves too, even if just for today… or to start a heart practice, forever?



About

Esalen Team

Esalen Harvest Milk

About

Esalen Team

Darnell Lamont Walker leading Rituals Writing Workshop
Category:
Food

Inspired by a walk through the Farm & Garden as farmers harvested for Thanksgiving dinner, this spiced nut milk is infused with the spirit of Esalen. Warm and nourishing for the body and mind, Harvest Milk is luxuriously creamy on its own, makes a great base for smoothies and is wonderful in a latte.

This recipe makes about six cups.

Ingredients

  • 1 cup raw almonds
  • 1 cup raw cashews
  • 12-15 fresh culinary sage leaves (set a few aside for when you're ready to serve)
  • 1/2 tbsp. cinnamon, extra to sprinkle upon serving
  • 1/2 tbsp. vanilla bean paste (can be substituted with real vanilla extract)
  • 2 oz. pure maple (dark amber Grade A) for sweetener to taste
  • Water to soak, blend and thin



Equipment

  • Measuring cup and spoons
  • Blender
  • 1 to 2 large glass containers with airtight lids
  • Fine mesh nut milk bag
  • Large saucepan
  • Whisk


Method

  1. Place nuts in a glass container and add water until they are covered by one inch. Cover the container to seal and let sit in the refrigerator for at least 12 hours or up to two days. This is key for creating a smooth, silky texture.
  2. Once nuts are thoroughly soaked, drain and discard the liquid. Rinse nuts thoroughly with cold water.
  3. Purée one cup of the soaked nuts with three cups of hot water (not boiling) in a blender on high speed until the mixture is smooth. This can take about 45-60 seconds. Line a saucepan with the nut milk bag, then pour mixture into the bag and let strain through. Repeat the blending step with the remaining nuts and pour that into the bag as well. Gather the open end of the nut milk bag around the mixture and twist closed. With clean hands, squeeze and press the mixture, extracting as much liquid as possible into the saucepan. The remaining pulp can be refrigerated and used within three days as meal/flour for raw or baked recipes.
  4. Place the saucepan over a burner and turn it to medium heat. Add in sage leaves and cinnamon. Whisk the mixture and simmer for approximately 30-45 minutes, whisking again every few minutes. If mixture begins to boil and bubble up, turn the burner down to a lower heat for the remaining time. The liquid will reduce slightly. Rinse nut milk bag to use again in the next step.
  5. Turn burner off and allow the nut milk to cool for five minutes. Line a clean glass container with the rinsed nut milk bag and pour contents of the saucepan into the bag to strain out the sage leaves. Be careful, as your milk may still be hot! You may want to add a bit of cold water to cool and to reach desired nut milk consistency. Add in vanilla bean paste and sweeten to taste with maple. Whisk to thoroughly combine.


You can enjoy this deliciously nourishing Harvest Milk warm or transfer it to an airtight container and refrigerate to enjoy later. It is best enjoyed within three to four days.  

When you are ready to serve, whisk to recombine. Rub a leaf of Sage around the rim of each glass to release a bit of the aroma, then pour Harvest Milk into the glass. Sprinkle with extra cinnamon and take a moment to close your eyes. Imagine walking through Esalen's beautiful Farm & Garden, your fingers brushing the sage bushes. Take a deep breath in...and out...and drink up!

“Remembering to be as self compassionate as I can and praying to the divine that we're all a part of.” 
–Aaron

“Prayer, reading, meditation, walking.”
–Karen
“Erratically — which is an ongoing stream of practice to find peace.”
–Charles
“Try on a daily basis to be kind to myself and to realize that making mistakes is a part of the human condition. Learning from our mistakes is a journey. But it starts with compassion and caring. First for oneself.”
–Steve

“Physically: aerobic exercise, volleyball, ice hockey, cycling, sailing. Emotionally: unfortunately I have to work to ‘not care’ about people or situations which may end painfully. Along the lines of ‘attachment is the source of suffering’, so best to avoid it or limit its scope. Sad though because it could also be the source of great joy. Is it worth the risk?“
–Rainer

“It's time for my heart to be nurtured on one level yet contained on another. To go easy on me and to allow my feelings to be validated, not judged harshly. On the other hand, to let the heart rule with equanimity and not lead the mind and body around like a master.”
–Suzanne

“I spend time thinking of everything I am grateful for, and I try to develop my ability to express compassion for myself and others without reservation. I take time to do the things I need to do to keep myself healthy and happy. This includes taking experiential workshops, fostering relationships, and participating within groups which have a similar interest to become a more compassionate and fulfilled being.“
–Peter

“Self-forgiveness for my own judgments. And oh yeah, coming to Esalen.”
–David B.

“Hmm, this is a tough one! I guess I take care of my heart through fostering relationships with people I feel connected to. Spending quality time with them (whether we're on the phone, through messages/letters, on Zoom, or in-person). Being there for them, listening to them, sharing what's going on with me, my struggles and my successes... like we do in the Esalen weekly Friends of Esalen Zoom sessions!”
–Lori

“I remind myself in many ways of the fact that " Love is all there is!" LOVE is the prize and this one precious life is the stage we get to learn our lessons. I get out into nature, hike, camp, river kayak, fly fish, garden, I create, I dance (not enough!), and I remain grateful for each day, each breath, each moment. Being in the moment, awake, and remembering the gift of life and my feeling of gratitude for all of creation.”
–Steven
“My physical heart by limiting stress and eating a heart-healthy diet. My emotional heart by staying in love with the world and by knowing that all disappointment and loss will pass.“
–David Z.


Today, September 29, is World Heart Day. Strike up a conversation with your own heart and as you feel comfortable, encourage others to do the same. As part of our own transformations and self-care, we sometimes ask for others to illuminate and enliven our hearts or speak our love language.

What if we could do this for ourselves too, even if just for today… or to start a heart practice, forever?



About

Esalen Team

Darnell Lamont Walker leading Rituals Writing Workshop
Esalen Harvest Milk
Category:
Food

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About

Esalen Team

Esalen Harvest Milk

About

Esalen Team

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