Darnell Lamont Walker leading Rituals Writing Workshop
Deep Dive into Positive Change with the Greater Good
Category:
Mind
Shauna Shapiro

These days, we seem to live in a time of unprecedented challenge. Climate change, social and economic inequality, political turmoil, and other headline news can illicit feelings of worry and frustration that deplete our capacity for positivity.

Yet according to the faculty leaders behind Esalen’s new property-wide Greater Good workshop, positive emotions are precisely what will help solve the challenges we face – and can dramatically increase our well-being.

“Although we cannot always control our outer environments, we do have some control over our interior environment,” says Shauna Shapiro who will be one of a number of faculty co-leading the August 13-18 workshop.

“The intention of the Greater Good workshop is to learn practices and tools to help cultivate our interior landscape, awakening our hearts and opening our minds, so that we can respond to our external environment with greater wisdom, courage, and compassion.”

Daniel Siegel

Psychological paradigms, neuroscience breakthroughs, ancient practices, and experiential exercises are just some of the areas that will be explored in this week-long workshop. During her recent TEDx talk, Shapiro shared more insight about how to turn negativity into positive new habits.

“We have this mistaken belief that if we shame ourselves we’ll somehow improve. And yet, shame doesn’t work. It can’t work…it shuts down our brain’s learning centers. What’s the alternative? Kind attention. Kindness gives us the courage to look at the parts of ourselves we might not want to see…and gives us the ability to change.” During Greater Good, she will share specific practices to expand consciousness to include compassion, kindness, and joy.

On this journey, mindfulness will be a common thread. Modern neuroscience now confirms what meditation practitioners have experienced for centuries: we can re-train our brains. Neuroplasticity is the ability of the brain to create new synaptic pathways based on new learning. And, it’s a process open to everyone.

Neuropsychologist and author Daniel Siegel joins the Greater Good faculty to demystify the neuroscience of well-being and show us how cultivating empathy and compassion can integrate the different aspects of our lives, including relationships.

Dacher Keltner

Author of Born to be Good and The Compassionate Instinct and co-founder of the Greater Good Science Center, Dacher Keltner has made the power of positive emotions his life’s work. During Greater Good, Esalen’s natural beauty will be the context for discovering new levels of awe, wonder, reverence, and gratitude, guided by Dacher.

Joining the faculty are writer Mollie McNeil and Zen master Teja Bell who will augment the workshop with unique creative writing practices centered on awe, and introductions to energy arts and experiential healing practices.

Learn more about the Greater Good workshop.


“Remembering to be as self compassionate as I can and praying to the divine that we're all a part of.” 
–Aaron

“Prayer, reading, meditation, walking.”
–Karen
“Erratically — which is an ongoing stream of practice to find peace.”
–Charles
“Try on a daily basis to be kind to myself and to realize that making mistakes is a part of the human condition. Learning from our mistakes is a journey. But it starts with compassion and caring. First for oneself.”
–Steve

“Physically: aerobic exercise, volleyball, ice hockey, cycling, sailing. Emotionally: unfortunately I have to work to ‘not care’ about people or situations which may end painfully. Along the lines of ‘attachment is the source of suffering’, so best to avoid it or limit its scope. Sad though because it could also be the source of great joy. Is it worth the risk?“
–Rainer

“It's time for my heart to be nurtured on one level yet contained on another. To go easy on me and to allow my feelings to be validated, not judged harshly. On the other hand, to let the heart rule with equanimity and not lead the mind and body around like a master.”
–Suzanne

“I spend time thinking of everything I am grateful for, and I try to develop my ability to express compassion for myself and others without reservation. I take time to do the things I need to do to keep myself healthy and happy. This includes taking experiential workshops, fostering relationships, and participating within groups which have a similar interest to become a more compassionate and fulfilled being.“
–Peter

“Self-forgiveness for my own judgments. And oh yeah, coming to Esalen.”
–David B.

“Hmm, this is a tough one! I guess I take care of my heart through fostering relationships with people I feel connected to. Spending quality time with them (whether we're on the phone, through messages/letters, on Zoom, or in-person). Being there for them, listening to them, sharing what's going on with me, my struggles and my successes... like we do in the Esalen weekly Friends of Esalen Zoom sessions!”
–Lori

“I remind myself in many ways of the fact that " Love is all there is!" LOVE is the prize and this one precious life is the stage we get to learn our lessons. I get out into nature, hike, camp, river kayak, fly fish, garden, I create, I dance (not enough!), and I remain grateful for each day, each breath, each moment. Being in the moment, awake, and remembering the gift of life and my feeling of gratitude for all of creation.”
–Steven
“My physical heart by limiting stress and eating a heart-healthy diet. My emotional heart by staying in love with the world and by knowing that all disappointment and loss will pass.“
–David Z.


Today, September 29, is World Heart Day. Strike up a conversation with your own heart and as you feel comfortable, encourage others to do the same. As part of our own transformations and self-care, we sometimes ask for others to illuminate and enliven our hearts or speak our love language.

What if we could do this for ourselves too, even if just for today… or to start a heart practice, forever?



About

Esalen Team

Darnell Lamont Walker leading Rituals Writing Workshop
Category:
Mind
Shauna Shapiro

These days, we seem to live in a time of unprecedented challenge. Climate change, social and economic inequality, political turmoil, and other headline news can illicit feelings of worry and frustration that deplete our capacity for positivity.

Yet according to the faculty leaders behind Esalen’s new property-wide Greater Good workshop, positive emotions are precisely what will help solve the challenges we face – and can dramatically increase our well-being.

“Although we cannot always control our outer environments, we do have some control over our interior environment,” says Shauna Shapiro who will be one of a number of faculty co-leading the August 13-18 workshop.

“The intention of the Greater Good workshop is to learn practices and tools to help cultivate our interior landscape, awakening our hearts and opening our minds, so that we can respond to our external environment with greater wisdom, courage, and compassion.”

Daniel Siegel

Psychological paradigms, neuroscience breakthroughs, ancient practices, and experiential exercises are just some of the areas that will be explored in this week-long workshop. During her recent TEDx talk, Shapiro shared more insight about how to turn negativity into positive new habits.

“We have this mistaken belief that if we shame ourselves we’ll somehow improve. And yet, shame doesn’t work. It can’t work…it shuts down our brain’s learning centers. What’s the alternative? Kind attention. Kindness gives us the courage to look at the parts of ourselves we might not want to see…and gives us the ability to change.” During Greater Good, she will share specific practices to expand consciousness to include compassion, kindness, and joy.

On this journey, mindfulness will be a common thread. Modern neuroscience now confirms what meditation practitioners have experienced for centuries: we can re-train our brains. Neuroplasticity is the ability of the brain to create new synaptic pathways based on new learning. And, it’s a process open to everyone.

Neuropsychologist and author Daniel Siegel joins the Greater Good faculty to demystify the neuroscience of well-being and show us how cultivating empathy and compassion can integrate the different aspects of our lives, including relationships.

Dacher Keltner

Author of Born to be Good and The Compassionate Instinct and co-founder of the Greater Good Science Center, Dacher Keltner has made the power of positive emotions his life’s work. During Greater Good, Esalen’s natural beauty will be the context for discovering new levels of awe, wonder, reverence, and gratitude, guided by Dacher.

Joining the faculty are writer Mollie McNeil and Zen master Teja Bell who will augment the workshop with unique creative writing practices centered on awe, and introductions to energy arts and experiential healing practices.

Learn more about the Greater Good workshop.


“Remembering to be as self compassionate as I can and praying to the divine that we're all a part of.” 
–Aaron

“Prayer, reading, meditation, walking.”
–Karen
“Erratically — which is an ongoing stream of practice to find peace.”
–Charles
“Try on a daily basis to be kind to myself and to realize that making mistakes is a part of the human condition. Learning from our mistakes is a journey. But it starts with compassion and caring. First for oneself.”
–Steve

“Physically: aerobic exercise, volleyball, ice hockey, cycling, sailing. Emotionally: unfortunately I have to work to ‘not care’ about people or situations which may end painfully. Along the lines of ‘attachment is the source of suffering’, so best to avoid it or limit its scope. Sad though because it could also be the source of great joy. Is it worth the risk?“
–Rainer

“It's time for my heart to be nurtured on one level yet contained on another. To go easy on me and to allow my feelings to be validated, not judged harshly. On the other hand, to let the heart rule with equanimity and not lead the mind and body around like a master.”
–Suzanne

“I spend time thinking of everything I am grateful for, and I try to develop my ability to express compassion for myself and others without reservation. I take time to do the things I need to do to keep myself healthy and happy. This includes taking experiential workshops, fostering relationships, and participating within groups which have a similar interest to become a more compassionate and fulfilled being.“
–Peter

“Self-forgiveness for my own judgments. And oh yeah, coming to Esalen.”
–David B.

“Hmm, this is a tough one! I guess I take care of my heart through fostering relationships with people I feel connected to. Spending quality time with them (whether we're on the phone, through messages/letters, on Zoom, or in-person). Being there for them, listening to them, sharing what's going on with me, my struggles and my successes... like we do in the Esalen weekly Friends of Esalen Zoom sessions!”
–Lori

“I remind myself in many ways of the fact that " Love is all there is!" LOVE is the prize and this one precious life is the stage we get to learn our lessons. I get out into nature, hike, camp, river kayak, fly fish, garden, I create, I dance (not enough!), and I remain grateful for each day, each breath, each moment. Being in the moment, awake, and remembering the gift of life and my feeling of gratitude for all of creation.”
–Steven
“My physical heart by limiting stress and eating a heart-healthy diet. My emotional heart by staying in love with the world and by knowing that all disappointment and loss will pass.“
–David Z.


Today, September 29, is World Heart Day. Strike up a conversation with your own heart and as you feel comfortable, encourage others to do the same. As part of our own transformations and self-care, we sometimes ask for others to illuminate and enliven our hearts or speak our love language.

What if we could do this for ourselves too, even if just for today… or to start a heart practice, forever?



About

Esalen Team

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